The case for incorporating Australian Aboriginal values in in-prison restorative justice processes for Australian Aboriginal participants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The high rates of Aboriginal prisoners returning to the Western Australian prison system is alarming; yet, there is a paucity of culturally appropriate programming to assist their restoration to lands and family. The article addresses these difficulties, first, by emphasising the importance of values. Using Kluckhohn’s (1951) theory of values, it investigates and compares two different traditional value systems—Aboriginal and Anglo-Australian and explores how the Aboriginal value of relationship has been suppressed under an Anglo-Australian hegemony. Secondly, the article documents the design of a value-oriented Aboriginal restorative justice process directed to addressing the legacy of wrongdoing inherited by prisoners, and, consecutively, the wrongdoing created by their own offences. The process foregrounds Aboriginal values as a meaningful basis for addressing wrongdoing, initiating healing to lives and relationships, and influencing cultural standards of behaviour. The article concludes with a discussion about the use of culturally adapted restorative justice processes in the prison system and suggests how this approach might be developed in and between the prison system and wider Aboriginal communities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe International Journal of Restorative Justice
Publication statusSubmitted - 2021

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