The built environment, neighborhood crime and constrained physical activity: An exploration of inconsistent findings

Sarah Foster, Billie Giles-Corti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

445 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. Personal safety is commonly cited in qualitative research as a barrier to local walking, yet the relationship between safety and constrained physical activity has received mixed support in quantitative studies. This paper reviews the quantitative evidence to date, seeking to explain the inconsistencies, and offers recommendations for future research.Methods. A social-ecological framework was adopted to explore the evidence linking crime-related safety, and factors that influence real and perceived safety, with constrained physical activity.Results. Perceived safety tends to affect the physical activity of groups already known to exhibit greater anxiety about crime: and some elements of the built environment that influence safety appear to constrain physical activity. However the evidence is somewhat inconsistent, and this may be partly attributed to measurement limitations. Many studies employ generic safety measures that make implicit references to crime or use composite variables that lack specificity. Physical activity outcomes also require consideration, as only activities occurring locally outdoors are likely to be affected by neighborhood crime.Conclusions. Further research is required to tease out associations between real and perceived crime-related safety and physical activity, ideally employing behaviour and crime-specific measures, and addressing the moderating role of the social and built environments. (c) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-251
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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