The best catch data that can possibly be? Rejoinder to Ye et al. "FAO's statistic data and sustainability of fisheries and aquaculture"

Daniel Pauly, Dirk Zeller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Here we reply to a commentary by Ye et al. (Mar. Policy 2017; Ye et al.) on our article (Pauly and Zeller, 2017 [2]) commenting on FAO's interpretation of current fisheries trends in SOFIA 2016 (The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture). We show how arguments such as FAO's catch statistics being "the best they can possibly be", and other manifestations of FAO's difficulties in constructively engaging with comments compromises FAO's stated goal to engage with academia and civil society. This is particularly serious in an age where the value of an open scientific discourse is increasingly under threat, as is the food security of many poor countries in which fish supplied by domestic fisheries constitutes a strong component of local diets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)406-410
JournalMarine Policy
Volume81
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

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FAO
catch statistics
Food and Agricultural Organization
fishery
aquaculture
statistics
sustainability
fisheries
fisheries statistics
food security
civil society
compromise
threat
diet
food
fish
interpretation
Statistics
Sustainability
Aquaculture

Cite this

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abstract = "Here we reply to a commentary by Ye et al. (Mar. Policy 2017; Ye et al.) on our article (Pauly and Zeller, 2017 [2]) commenting on FAO's interpretation of current fisheries trends in SOFIA 2016 (The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture). We show how arguments such as FAO's catch statistics being {"}the best they can possibly be{"}, and other manifestations of FAO's difficulties in constructively engaging with comments compromises FAO's stated goal to engage with academia and civil society. This is particularly serious in an age where the value of an open scientific discourse is increasingly under threat, as is the food security of many poor countries in which fish supplied by domestic fisheries constitutes a strong component of local diets.",
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