The association between low temperatures and anatomical changes in preanthetic ovules of Musa (Musaceae)

Jeanie Fortescue, David Turner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bananas growing in subtropical environments suffer tissue malformation in fruit structures that is associated with mean daily temperatures of about 14 degrees C during differentiation of the fruit tissues. Low temperatures may also affect the pre-anthetic ovules and contribute to loss of functionality in reproductive structures. Ovules of Musa acuminata Colla ssp. that experienced a range, 3-18 degrees C, of minimum temperatures in the field, were examined for anatomical changes. We assumed that low temperatures caused the changes by association with the gross abnormalities of flower structure described in the literature. The first sign of anatomical changes in Ovules associated with low temperature was the protrusion of the nucellus and nucellar cap through the micropyle forming a tongue, which often contained the embryo sac. Malformed ovules were found next to normal ones, especially in ovaries that displayed no outward signs of malformation associated with low temperatures.The ovules affected by low temperature were smaller, grew less between developmental stages and remained more round towards anthesis than those that were unaffected. Affected ovules had smaller female gameotphytes that occupied a reduced proportion of the nucellus. In addition, the distance between the embryo sac and the nucellar cap increased, however the number of intervening cells did not. The nucellar cells in the tongue were squashed longitudinally. Malformations of ovules were observed in bunches emerging in the autumn and winter as well as spring, associated with low temperatures at a critical period in the few weeks before anthesis when the archesporia and megaspore were formed. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-444
JournalScientia Horticulturae: an international journal
Volume104
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Musaceae
Musa
ovules
temperature
embryo sac
tongue
flowering
Musa acuminata
megaspores
fruits
bananas
developmental stages
cells
autumn
flowers

Cite this

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title = "The association between low temperatures and anatomical changes in preanthetic ovules of Musa (Musaceae)",
abstract = "Bananas growing in subtropical environments suffer tissue malformation in fruit structures that is associated with mean daily temperatures of about 14 degrees C during differentiation of the fruit tissues. Low temperatures may also affect the pre-anthetic ovules and contribute to loss of functionality in reproductive structures. Ovules of Musa acuminata Colla ssp. that experienced a range, 3-18 degrees C, of minimum temperatures in the field, were examined for anatomical changes. We assumed that low temperatures caused the changes by association with the gross abnormalities of flower structure described in the literature. The first sign of anatomical changes in Ovules associated with low temperature was the protrusion of the nucellus and nucellar cap through the micropyle forming a tongue, which often contained the embryo sac. Malformed ovules were found next to normal ones, especially in ovaries that displayed no outward signs of malformation associated with low temperatures.The ovules affected by low temperature were smaller, grew less between developmental stages and remained more round towards anthesis than those that were unaffected. Affected ovules had smaller female gameotphytes that occupied a reduced proportion of the nucellus. In addition, the distance between the embryo sac and the nucellar cap increased, however the number of intervening cells did not. The nucellar cells in the tongue were squashed longitudinally. Malformations of ovules were observed in bunches emerging in the autumn and winter as well as spring, associated with low temperatures at a critical period in the few weeks before anthesis when the archesporia and megaspore were formed. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
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The association between low temperatures and anatomical changes in preanthetic ovules of Musa (Musaceae). / Fortescue, Jeanie; Turner, David.

In: Scientia Horticulturae: an international journal, Vol. 104, No. 4, 2005, p. 433-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AU - Turner, David

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AB - Bananas growing in subtropical environments suffer tissue malformation in fruit structures that is associated with mean daily temperatures of about 14 degrees C during differentiation of the fruit tissues. Low temperatures may also affect the pre-anthetic ovules and contribute to loss of functionality in reproductive structures. Ovules of Musa acuminata Colla ssp. that experienced a range, 3-18 degrees C, of minimum temperatures in the field, were examined for anatomical changes. We assumed that low temperatures caused the changes by association with the gross abnormalities of flower structure described in the literature. The first sign of anatomical changes in Ovules associated with low temperature was the protrusion of the nucellus and nucellar cap through the micropyle forming a tongue, which often contained the embryo sac. Malformed ovules were found next to normal ones, especially in ovaries that displayed no outward signs of malformation associated with low temperatures.The ovules affected by low temperature were smaller, grew less between developmental stages and remained more round towards anthesis than those that were unaffected. Affected ovules had smaller female gameotphytes that occupied a reduced proportion of the nucellus. In addition, the distance between the embryo sac and the nucellar cap increased, however the number of intervening cells did not. The nucellar cells in the tongue were squashed longitudinally. Malformations of ovules were observed in bunches emerging in the autumn and winter as well as spring, associated with low temperatures at a critical period in the few weeks before anthesis when the archesporia and megaspore were formed. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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