The association between functional independence and quality of life for individuals with acquired brain injury undergoing community-based rehabilitation and disability support

Harshana Seneviratne, Georgina Mann, Lakkhina Troeung, Angelita Martini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Following acquired brain injury (ABI), cognitive and physical barriers can prevent access to a previously enjoyed lifestyle, reducing quality of life. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine predictors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults with ABI receiving post-acute community-based rehabilitation and disability support services, using tools developed for this population. METHODS: Retrospective cross-sectional design. Main outcome measures were the Quality of Life after Brain Injury Inventory (QOLIBRI) and Functional Independence and Assessment Measure (FIM'+'FAM) for adults with ABI (n'='67) undergoing post-acute rehabilitation in Western Australia, 2015-2021. RESULTS: Mean QOLIBRI total score (±standard deviation) was 57.2±17.4, indicating impaired HRQoL, with mood disorders likely prevalent. Regression analysis demonstrated no differences in HRQoL between different age groups, sexes or brain injury types. Shorter time since injury and lower total FIM'+'FAM score significantly predicted poorer HRQoL in the model. CONCLUSION: This population appears vulnerable to psychological illness, although HRQoL is addressed for a minority of clients during routine post-acute care (19%). As improvement in quality of life is a fundamental goal of rehabilitation post-ABI, understanding the relationship between potentially modifiable factors such as functional independence and HRQoL is critical to improve outcomes and provide the best chance at a satisfying life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-302
Number of pages12
JournalNeuroRehabilitation
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Jun 2022
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The association between functional independence and quality of life for individuals with acquired brain injury undergoing community-based rehabilitation and disability support'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this