The Asia-Australia Gravitational Wave Detector Concept

David Blair, Zong-Hong Zhu, Li Ju, Eric Howell, Chunnong Zhao, Hui-Tong Chua, Simon Anderson, Leong Cheng Man

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Abstract

The discovery of gravitational waves enabled assessment of the science benefits of new improved gravitational wave detectors. This paper discusses the science benefits of an Asia-Australia Gravitational wave Observatory (AAGO) consisting of a pair of widely spaced gravitational wave detectors on a north-south axis. Initial sensitivity would be ˜4 times better than the projected sensitivity of Advanced LIGO, but designed for future upgrades to match proposed third generation detectors. AAGO would enable near optimum angular resolution of sources, and signal detections at a rate ˜1 per hour, sufficient to monitor a substantial fraction of all large mass black hole merger events in the universe. The proposed conceptual design and infrastructure, technical issues and challenges are discussed.

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gravitational waves
LIGO (observatory)
signal detection
sensitivity
detectors
angular resolution

Cite this

@article{9501249e6eab45eab2846e97b4882ca7,
title = "The Asia-Australia Gravitational Wave Detector Concept",
abstract = "The discovery of gravitational waves enabled assessment of the science benefits of new improved gravitational wave detectors. This paper discusses the science benefits of an Asia-Australia Gravitational wave Observatory (AAGO) consisting of a pair of widely spaced gravitational wave detectors on a north-south axis. Initial sensitivity would be ˜4 times better than the projected sensitivity of Advanced LIGO, but designed for future upgrades to match proposed third generation detectors. AAGO would enable near optimum angular resolution of sources, and signal detections at a rate ˜1 per hour, sufficient to monitor a substantial fraction of all large mass black hole merger events in the universe. The proposed conceptual design and infrastructure, technical issues and challenges are discussed.",
author = "David Blair and Zong-Hong Zhu and Li Ju and Eric Howell and Chunnong Zhao and Hui-Tong Chua and Simon Anderson and Man, {Leong Cheng}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1142/9789813231801_0002",
language = "English",
pages = "13--23",
journal = "Cosmology, Gravitational Waves and Particles, Proceedings of the Conference. Edited by Harald Fritzsch",
publisher = "World Scientific Publishing",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Asia-Australia Gravitational Wave Detector Concept

AU - Blair, David

AU - Zhu, Zong-Hong

AU - Ju, Li

AU - Howell, Eric

AU - Zhao, Chunnong

AU - Chua, Hui-Tong

AU - Anderson, Simon

AU - Man, Leong Cheng

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - The discovery of gravitational waves enabled assessment of the science benefits of new improved gravitational wave detectors. This paper discusses the science benefits of an Asia-Australia Gravitational wave Observatory (AAGO) consisting of a pair of widely spaced gravitational wave detectors on a north-south axis. Initial sensitivity would be ˜4 times better than the projected sensitivity of Advanced LIGO, but designed for future upgrades to match proposed third generation detectors. AAGO would enable near optimum angular resolution of sources, and signal detections at a rate ˜1 per hour, sufficient to monitor a substantial fraction of all large mass black hole merger events in the universe. The proposed conceptual design and infrastructure, technical issues and challenges are discussed.

AB - The discovery of gravitational waves enabled assessment of the science benefits of new improved gravitational wave detectors. This paper discusses the science benefits of an Asia-Australia Gravitational wave Observatory (AAGO) consisting of a pair of widely spaced gravitational wave detectors on a north-south axis. Initial sensitivity would be ˜4 times better than the projected sensitivity of Advanced LIGO, but designed for future upgrades to match proposed third generation detectors. AAGO would enable near optimum angular resolution of sources, and signal detections at a rate ˜1 per hour, sufficient to monitor a substantial fraction of all large mass black hole merger events in the universe. The proposed conceptual design and infrastructure, technical issues and challenges are discussed.

U2 - 10.1142/9789813231801_0002

DO - 10.1142/9789813231801_0002

M3 - Article

SP - 13

EP - 23

JO - Cosmology, Gravitational Waves and Particles, Proceedings of the Conference. Edited by Harald Fritzsch

JF - Cosmology, Gravitational Waves and Particles, Proceedings of the Conference. Edited by Harald Fritzsch

ER -