The aetiological significance of early childhood trauma and temperament in the pathogenesis of borderline personality disorder

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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    Abstract

    [Truncated] This research addresses two questions: what role does early childhood trauma play in the pathogenesis of borderline personality disorder (BPD)? and what is the contribution of temperament to the pathogenesis of BPD? The research literature over the last thirteen years has cited a causal role for early childhood sexual abuse in the aetiology of BPD. However, the research to date has failed to provide an examination of the detailed parameters of the abuse experiences and how these may adversely influence personality development. Consequently, our understanding of the type of abuse experiences that may contribute to the pathogenesis of BPD and how these experiences may influence symptom formation awaits determination. Furthermore, the contribution of temperament to the development of BPD is also a poorly understood area of inquiry. One hundred and three individuals agreed to participate in the research. The research cohort consisted of three groups: a BPD group (51 participants), a non-BPD cluster B group (11 participants), and a community control group (41 participants). All participants were given two self-report questionnaires: The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Additionally, participants were involved in two clinical interviews: The International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE) and the Childhood Trauma Interview (CTI).
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2001

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