The addition of mine waste rock to topsoil improves microsite potential and seedling emergence from broadcast seeds in an arid environment

Peter J. Golos, Lucy E. Commander, Kingsley W. Dixon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: This study investigated the effect of method of blending and spreading topsoil-waste rock (as dictated by waste dump position), rock addition, topsoil source and seed burial on seedling emergence from seeds broadcast onto mine restoration sites. Methods: Seed of 10 species were surface sown onto a waste rock dump plateau with six cover treatments spread by loose tipping; three topsoil source treatments (sand dunes, sandplains and stony hills) x two waste rock treatments (topsoil mixed and without waste rock). Results: Emergence was greater on the waste dump plateau than slopes, where very few seedlings emerged. On the waste dump plateau, the addition of rock to topsoil increased seedling emergence >2.5-fold. Soil surface temperatures were cooler and water content at a depth of 2 cm was higher in topsoil mixed with rock than without rock. Conclusions: Higher seedling emergence with the addition of rock to topsoil was due to the creation of microsites where sub-soil moisture was retained for longer durations. Lack of emergence on waste dump slopes was attributed to relatively low surface roughness that reflected operational issues associated with different methods of spreading and mixing topsoil with rock on plateau versus on slopes.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalPlant and Soil
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

mine waste
seedling emergence
dry environmental conditions
arid environment
topsoil
rocks
seed
seeds
rock
plateaus
plateau
seed burial
surface roughness
subsoil
dunes
coolers
soil temperature
surface temperature
dune
soil surface

Cite this

@article{42b0d37ef7bb42f8a96893732d331452,
title = "The addition of mine waste rock to topsoil improves microsite potential and seedling emergence from broadcast seeds in an arid environment",
abstract = "Aims: This study investigated the effect of method of blending and spreading topsoil-waste rock (as dictated by waste dump position), rock addition, topsoil source and seed burial on seedling emergence from seeds broadcast onto mine restoration sites. Methods: Seed of 10 species were surface sown onto a waste rock dump plateau with six cover treatments spread by loose tipping; three topsoil source treatments (sand dunes, sandplains and stony hills) x two waste rock treatments (topsoil mixed and without waste rock). Results: Emergence was greater on the waste dump plateau than slopes, where very few seedlings emerged. On the waste dump plateau, the addition of rock to topsoil increased seedling emergence >2.5-fold. Soil surface temperatures were cooler and water content at a depth of 2 cm was higher in topsoil mixed with rock than without rock. Conclusions: Higher seedling emergence with the addition of rock to topsoil was due to the creation of microsites where sub-soil moisture was retained for longer durations. Lack of emergence on waste dump slopes was attributed to relatively low surface roughness that reflected operational issues associated with different methods of spreading and mixing topsoil with rock on plateau versus on slopes.",
keywords = "Arid ecosystem, Mine site, Restoration ecology, Triodia, Waste rock dump",
author = "Golos, {Peter J.} and Commander, {Lucy E.} and Dixon, {Kingsley W.}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1007/s11104-019-04060-7",
language = "English",
journal = "Plant and Soil: An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships",
issn = "0032-079X",
publisher = "Springer",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The addition of mine waste rock to topsoil improves microsite potential and seedling emergence from broadcast seeds in an arid environment

AU - Golos, Peter J.

AU - Commander, Lucy E.

AU - Dixon, Kingsley W.

PY - 2019/4/12

Y1 - 2019/4/12

N2 - Aims: This study investigated the effect of method of blending and spreading topsoil-waste rock (as dictated by waste dump position), rock addition, topsoil source and seed burial on seedling emergence from seeds broadcast onto mine restoration sites. Methods: Seed of 10 species were surface sown onto a waste rock dump plateau with six cover treatments spread by loose tipping; three topsoil source treatments (sand dunes, sandplains and stony hills) x two waste rock treatments (topsoil mixed and without waste rock). Results: Emergence was greater on the waste dump plateau than slopes, where very few seedlings emerged. On the waste dump plateau, the addition of rock to topsoil increased seedling emergence >2.5-fold. Soil surface temperatures were cooler and water content at a depth of 2 cm was higher in topsoil mixed with rock than without rock. Conclusions: Higher seedling emergence with the addition of rock to topsoil was due to the creation of microsites where sub-soil moisture was retained for longer durations. Lack of emergence on waste dump slopes was attributed to relatively low surface roughness that reflected operational issues associated with different methods of spreading and mixing topsoil with rock on plateau versus on slopes.

AB - Aims: This study investigated the effect of method of blending and spreading topsoil-waste rock (as dictated by waste dump position), rock addition, topsoil source and seed burial on seedling emergence from seeds broadcast onto mine restoration sites. Methods: Seed of 10 species were surface sown onto a waste rock dump plateau with six cover treatments spread by loose tipping; three topsoil source treatments (sand dunes, sandplains and stony hills) x two waste rock treatments (topsoil mixed and without waste rock). Results: Emergence was greater on the waste dump plateau than slopes, where very few seedlings emerged. On the waste dump plateau, the addition of rock to topsoil increased seedling emergence >2.5-fold. Soil surface temperatures were cooler and water content at a depth of 2 cm was higher in topsoil mixed with rock than without rock. Conclusions: Higher seedling emergence with the addition of rock to topsoil was due to the creation of microsites where sub-soil moisture was retained for longer durations. Lack of emergence on waste dump slopes was attributed to relatively low surface roughness that reflected operational issues associated with different methods of spreading and mixing topsoil with rock on plateau versus on slopes.

KW - Arid ecosystem

KW - Mine site

KW - Restoration ecology

KW - Triodia

KW - Waste rock dump

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064476695&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11104-019-04060-7

DO - 10.1007/s11104-019-04060-7

M3 - Article

JO - Plant and Soil: An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships

JF - Plant and Soil: An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships

SN - 0032-079X

ER -