Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and estradiol are differentially associated with carotid intima-media thickness and the presence of carotid plaque in men with and without coronary artery disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clarifying the relationship of sex hormones to preclinical atherosclerosis could illuminate pathways by which androgens are associated with cardiovascular events and mortality. Our aim was to determine hormone profiles associated with carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid atheroma, in men with and without known coronary artery disease (CAD). We included 492 community-based men aged 20-70 years (Group A) and 426 men with angiographically proven CAD aged <60 years (Group B). Fasting early morning sera were assayed for testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol (E2) using mass spectrometry. CIMT and carotid plaque were assessed ultrasonographically. Mean (±SD) age was Group A: 53.8±12.6 and Group B: 49.6±5.1 years. Higher T was associated with reduced CIMT (-0.011 mm per 1-SD increase, p=0.042) and lower prevalence of carotid plaque (odds ratio [OR] per 1-SD increase, 0.68, p=0.012) in Group A, but not B. E2 was associated with increased CIMT in Group A (0.013 mm, p=0.011) but not B. Higher DHT and E2 were associated with reduced carotid plaque in Group B (DHT: OR=0.77, p=0.024; E2: OR=0.75, p=0.008), but not A. In community-dwelling men, higher T is associated with favourable CIMT and lower prevalence of carotid plaque, while higher E2 is associated with worse CIMT. In men with CAD, higher DHT or E2 are associated with less carotid plaque. T, DHT and E2 are differentially associated with preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in a cardiovascular phenotype-specific manner. Interventional studies are needed to examine effects of exogenous T and its metabolites DHT and E2, on atherogenesis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)777-786
JournalEndocrine Journal
Volume62
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2015

Fingerprint

Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Dihydrotestosterone
Testosterone
Coronary Artery Disease
Estradiol
Odds Ratio
Atherosclerosis
Independent Living
Carotid Artery Diseases
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Androgens
Fasting
Mass Spectrometry
Age Groups
Hormones
Phenotype
Mortality
Serum

Cite this

@article{126710e92f00467db0b7c76f2cf6e41d,
title = "Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and estradiol are differentially associated with carotid intima-media thickness and the presence of carotid plaque in men with and without coronary artery disease",
abstract = "Clarifying the relationship of sex hormones to preclinical atherosclerosis could illuminate pathways by which androgens are associated with cardiovascular events and mortality. Our aim was to determine hormone profiles associated with carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid atheroma, in men with and without known coronary artery disease (CAD). We included 492 community-based men aged 20-70 years (Group A) and 426 men with angiographically proven CAD aged <60 years (Group B). Fasting early morning sera were assayed for testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol (E2) using mass spectrometry. CIMT and carotid plaque were assessed ultrasonographically. Mean (±SD) age was Group A: 53.8±12.6 and Group B: 49.6±5.1 years. Higher T was associated with reduced CIMT (-0.011 mm per 1-SD increase, p=0.042) and lower prevalence of carotid plaque (odds ratio [OR] per 1-SD increase, 0.68, p=0.012) in Group A, but not B. E2 was associated with increased CIMT in Group A (0.013 mm, p=0.011) but not B. Higher DHT and E2 were associated with reduced carotid plaque in Group B (DHT: OR=0.77, p=0.024; E2: OR=0.75, p=0.008), but not A. In community-dwelling men, higher T is associated with favourable CIMT and lower prevalence of carotid plaque, while higher E2 is associated with worse CIMT. In men with CAD, higher DHT or E2 are associated with less carotid plaque. T, DHT and E2 are differentially associated with preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in a cardiovascular phenotype-specific manner. Interventional studies are needed to examine effects of exogenous T and its metabolites DHT and E2, on atherogenesis.",
author = "Chan, {Yi Xian} and Matthew Knuiman and Joe Hung and Mark Divitini and D.J. Handelsman and John Beilby and Brendan Mcquillan and Bu Yeap",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1507/endocrj.EJ15-0196",
language = "English",
volume = "62",
pages = "777--786",
journal = "Endocrine Journal",
issn = "0918-8959",
publisher = "The Japan Endocrine Society",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and estradiol are differentially associated with carotid intima-media thickness and the presence of carotid plaque in men with and without coronary artery disease

AU - Chan, Yi Xian

AU - Knuiman, Matthew

AU - Hung, Joe

AU - Divitini, Mark

AU - Handelsman, D.J.

AU - Beilby, John

AU - Mcquillan, Brendan

AU - Yeap, Bu

PY - 2015/9

Y1 - 2015/9

N2 - Clarifying the relationship of sex hormones to preclinical atherosclerosis could illuminate pathways by which androgens are associated with cardiovascular events and mortality. Our aim was to determine hormone profiles associated with carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid atheroma, in men with and without known coronary artery disease (CAD). We included 492 community-based men aged 20-70 years (Group A) and 426 men with angiographically proven CAD aged <60 years (Group B). Fasting early morning sera were assayed for testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol (E2) using mass spectrometry. CIMT and carotid plaque were assessed ultrasonographically. Mean (±SD) age was Group A: 53.8±12.6 and Group B: 49.6±5.1 years. Higher T was associated with reduced CIMT (-0.011 mm per 1-SD increase, p=0.042) and lower prevalence of carotid plaque (odds ratio [OR] per 1-SD increase, 0.68, p=0.012) in Group A, but not B. E2 was associated with increased CIMT in Group A (0.013 mm, p=0.011) but not B. Higher DHT and E2 were associated with reduced carotid plaque in Group B (DHT: OR=0.77, p=0.024; E2: OR=0.75, p=0.008), but not A. In community-dwelling men, higher T is associated with favourable CIMT and lower prevalence of carotid plaque, while higher E2 is associated with worse CIMT. In men with CAD, higher DHT or E2 are associated with less carotid plaque. T, DHT and E2 are differentially associated with preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in a cardiovascular phenotype-specific manner. Interventional studies are needed to examine effects of exogenous T and its metabolites DHT and E2, on atherogenesis.

AB - Clarifying the relationship of sex hormones to preclinical atherosclerosis could illuminate pathways by which androgens are associated with cardiovascular events and mortality. Our aim was to determine hormone profiles associated with carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid atheroma, in men with and without known coronary artery disease (CAD). We included 492 community-based men aged 20-70 years (Group A) and 426 men with angiographically proven CAD aged <60 years (Group B). Fasting early morning sera were assayed for testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol (E2) using mass spectrometry. CIMT and carotid plaque were assessed ultrasonographically. Mean (±SD) age was Group A: 53.8±12.6 and Group B: 49.6±5.1 years. Higher T was associated with reduced CIMT (-0.011 mm per 1-SD increase, p=0.042) and lower prevalence of carotid plaque (odds ratio [OR] per 1-SD increase, 0.68, p=0.012) in Group A, but not B. E2 was associated with increased CIMT in Group A (0.013 mm, p=0.011) but not B. Higher DHT and E2 were associated with reduced carotid plaque in Group B (DHT: OR=0.77, p=0.024; E2: OR=0.75, p=0.008), but not A. In community-dwelling men, higher T is associated with favourable CIMT and lower prevalence of carotid plaque, while higher E2 is associated with worse CIMT. In men with CAD, higher DHT or E2 are associated with less carotid plaque. T, DHT and E2 are differentially associated with preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in a cardiovascular phenotype-specific manner. Interventional studies are needed to examine effects of exogenous T and its metabolites DHT and E2, on atherogenesis.

U2 - 10.1507/endocrj.EJ15-0196

DO - 10.1507/endocrj.EJ15-0196

M3 - Article

VL - 62

SP - 777

EP - 786

JO - Endocrine Journal

JF - Endocrine Journal

SN - 0918-8959

IS - 9

ER -