Testing a mechanistic model. V. The points of zero salt effect for phosphate retention, for zinc retention and for acid/alkali titration of a soil

N. J. BARROW, A. S. ELLIS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pH of samples of a soil was altered by adding acid or lime and incubating the moistened soil at 60°C. The effect of varying the concentration of salt on pH, retention of phosphate, and retention of zinc was then measured. At low pH, increasing the concentration of salt decreased phosphate retention; at high pH, it increased it. The pH at which the effects crossed over (that is, the point of zero salt effect on phosphate retention) was higher than the point of zero salt effect on pH. This is opposite to effects observed with uniform surfaces. These results were described by a model in which it was assumed that individual sites varied in their electrostatic potential and that phosphate was retained preferentially by sites with the highest potential. Zinc retention was decreased by high concentrations of salt. This was partly because of effects of salt in decreasing the pH of solutions in contact with soil. There was no indication of a crossing‐over of effects at low pH. This suggested that the electrostatic potential of zinc‐retaining sites did not vary much with pH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-310
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Soil Science
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1986

Fingerprint

mechanistic models
Alkalies
titration
alkalis
Soil
Salts
zinc
phosphate
phosphates
salt
salts
Acids
acids
acid
soil
testing
salt concentration
Phosphates
Static Electricity
zinc phosphate

Cite this

@article{b8ffe8904ec941a9825acf4f52a47a1e,
title = "Testing a mechanistic model. V. The points of zero salt effect for phosphate retention, for zinc retention and for acid/alkali titration of a soil",
abstract = "The pH of samples of a soil was altered by adding acid or lime and incubating the moistened soil at 60°C. The effect of varying the concentration of salt on pH, retention of phosphate, and retention of zinc was then measured. At low pH, increasing the concentration of salt decreased phosphate retention; at high pH, it increased it. The pH at which the effects crossed over (that is, the point of zero salt effect on phosphate retention) was higher than the point of zero salt effect on pH. This is opposite to effects observed with uniform surfaces. These results were described by a model in which it was assumed that individual sites varied in their electrostatic potential and that phosphate was retained preferentially by sites with the highest potential. Zinc retention was decreased by high concentrations of salt. This was partly because of effects of salt in decreasing the pH of solutions in contact with soil. There was no indication of a crossing‐over of effects at low pH. This suggested that the electrostatic potential of zinc‐retaining sites did not vary much with pH.",
author = "BARROW, {N. J.} and ELLIS, {A. S.}",
year = "1986",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2389.1986.tb00032.x",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "303--310",
journal = "Journal of Soil Science",
issn = "0022-4588",
publisher = "Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Testing a mechanistic model. V. The points of zero salt effect for phosphate retention, for zinc retention and for acid/alkali titration of a soil

AU - BARROW, N. J.

AU - ELLIS, A. S.

PY - 1986/1/1

Y1 - 1986/1/1

N2 - The pH of samples of a soil was altered by adding acid or lime and incubating the moistened soil at 60°C. The effect of varying the concentration of salt on pH, retention of phosphate, and retention of zinc was then measured. At low pH, increasing the concentration of salt decreased phosphate retention; at high pH, it increased it. The pH at which the effects crossed over (that is, the point of zero salt effect on phosphate retention) was higher than the point of zero salt effect on pH. This is opposite to effects observed with uniform surfaces. These results were described by a model in which it was assumed that individual sites varied in their electrostatic potential and that phosphate was retained preferentially by sites with the highest potential. Zinc retention was decreased by high concentrations of salt. This was partly because of effects of salt in decreasing the pH of solutions in contact with soil. There was no indication of a crossing‐over of effects at low pH. This suggested that the electrostatic potential of zinc‐retaining sites did not vary much with pH.

AB - The pH of samples of a soil was altered by adding acid or lime and incubating the moistened soil at 60°C. The effect of varying the concentration of salt on pH, retention of phosphate, and retention of zinc was then measured. At low pH, increasing the concentration of salt decreased phosphate retention; at high pH, it increased it. The pH at which the effects crossed over (that is, the point of zero salt effect on phosphate retention) was higher than the point of zero salt effect on pH. This is opposite to effects observed with uniform surfaces. These results were described by a model in which it was assumed that individual sites varied in their electrostatic potential and that phosphate was retained preferentially by sites with the highest potential. Zinc retention was decreased by high concentrations of salt. This was partly because of effects of salt in decreasing the pH of solutions in contact with soil. There was no indication of a crossing‐over of effects at low pH. This suggested that the electrostatic potential of zinc‐retaining sites did not vary much with pH.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022927558&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2389.1986.tb00032.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2389.1986.tb00032.x

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 303

EP - 310

JO - Journal of Soil Science

JF - Journal of Soil Science

SN - 0022-4588

IS - 2

ER -