Systemic hypersensitive resistance to turnip mosaic virus in brassica juncea is associated with multiple defense responses, especially phloem necrosis and xylem occlusion

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Abstract

© 2016 The American Phytopathological Society.Systemic hypersensitive resistance (SHR) caused by Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) was studied by light microscopy and histochemical analysis in stem cross sections of Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) plants. Ten TuMV isolates were inoculated to leaves of susceptible line JM 06006, cv. Oasis CI, which carries TuMV systemic hypersensitivity gene TuRBJU 01, and F3 progeny plants obtained from a cross between them. Systemic mosaic (SM) symptoms were induced by all 10 isolates in plants of JM 06006, and by resistance-breaking isolate NSW-3 in all cv. Oasis CI and F3 plants. With the other nine isolates, cv. Oasis CI plants developed SHR while F3 progeny plants segregated for both phenotypes; mock-inoculated control plants never became infected. Presence of SHR did not delay systemic invasion as this commenced within 2 hours after inoculation (hai) and was almost complete by 72 hai regardless of whether plants subsequently developed SHR or SM. When stem cross sections sampled 9 to 12 days after inoculation were examined for the plant defense responses, phloem necrosis, hydrogen peroxide accumulation, and additional lignin deposition, sections from plants with SHR demonstrated all of these characteristics, but sections from plants with SM or mock-inoculation did not. Based on consolidated data from all isolates except NSW-3, stems developing SHR had significantly more occluded xylem vessels (P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1261-1270
Number of pages10
JournalPlant Disease
Volume100
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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