Systematic Review and Meta-analysis: Mental Health in Children With Neurogenetic Disorders Associated With Intellectual Disability

Emma J. Glasson, Nicholas Buckley, Wai Chen, Helen Leonard, Amy Epstein, Rachel Skoss, Peter Jacoby, A. Marie Blackmore, Jenny Bourke, Jenny Downs

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The behavioral phenotype of neurogenetic disorders associated with intellectual disability often includes psychiatric comorbidity. The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to systematically review the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and symptoms in children and adolescents with these disorders and compare phenotypic signatures between syndromes. Method: MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles from study inception to December 2018. Eligible articles were peer reviewed, were published in English, and reported prevalence data for psychiatric disorders and symptoms in children and adolescents aged 4 to 21 years using a formal psychiatric assessment or a standardized assessment of mental health symptoms. Pooled prevalence was determined using a random-effects meta-analysis in studies with sufficient data. Prevalence estimates were compared with general population data using a test of binomial proportions. Results: Of 2,301 studies identified for review, 39 articles were included in the final pool, which provided data on 4,039 children and adolescents. Ten syndromes were represented, and five were predominant: Down syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Prader-Willi syndrome. The Child Behavior Checklist was the most commonly used assessment tool for psychiatric symptoms. The pooled prevalence with total scores above the clinical threshold was lowest for Down syndrome (32% [95% confidence interval, 19%-44%]) and highest for Prader-Willi syndrome (74% [95% CI, 65%-82%]) with each syndrome associated with significantly higher prevalence than in the general population. Parallel trends were observed for the internalizing and externalizing domains and social subscale scores. Conclusion: Differential vulnerability for psychiatric phenotype expression across the disorders was observed. Syndromes with higher levels of social ability or competence appear to offer relative protection against developing psychopathology. This preliminary finding merits further exploration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1036-1048
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume59
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020

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