Supported Decision-Making for People Living with Dementia: An Examination of Four Australian Guardianship Laws

Meredith Blake, Cameron Stewart, Pia Castelli-Arnold, Craig Sinclair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Australia is obliged under the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to provide decision-making support to people with cognitive impairment. While there has been considerable recent activity looking at how the law should respond to the challenges raised by the Convention, there has been little discussion in Australia of how these changes will impact upon the care of people with dementia (the largest class of person with cognitive impairment in Australia). This section examines current Australian legal approaches to decision-making for people with dementia in four jurisdictions (New South Wales, South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia) through an analysis of reported tribunal decisions in each of these jurisdictions. It notes the scope for informal supported decision-making and the basis for the invocation of guardianship orders, including the new Victorian supportive guardianship order, and compares the new standards raised by the Convention. The section considers legal reforms which could improve the implementation of supported decision-making for people living with dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-420
Number of pages32
JournalJournal of Law and Medicine
Volume28
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2021

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