Supplementing a neuroanatomical module with YouTube videos does not increase student learning outcomes.

Amanda Meyer, Emad M Ardakani

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Tertiary students have positive perceptions of viewing anatomy videos on YouTube. The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective objective comparison of 2015 and 2016 cohorts to see if active encouragement of watching neuroanatomy videos improved student outcomes. Second year students undertaking their final gross anatomy unit were invited to voluntarily participate. Each cohort was given a 40‐mark neuroanatomy test with 15 questions exactly the same to allow direct comparison using independent t‐tests. The 2016 cohort were asked to watch 15 neuroanatomy Soton Brain Hub YouTube videos and complete a survey regarding their use of the videos. Linear regression analysis was used to determine if there was an association between video use, perceptions, and test scores. The demographics of the 2015 (n = 49; 22 ± 5 years; 22 males) and 2016 (n = 54; 22 ± 4 years; 20 males) cohorts were equivalent and there was no difference in Semester 1 anatomy assessment scores (P = 0.32). The 2016 cohort watched 10 ± 4 videos 2.4 ± 1.6 times each. The majority (89%) of 2016 students reported the videos improved their learning of neuroanatomy; however, neuroanatomy test scores were not different between the two cohorts (P = 0.42). The neuroanatomy test scores were not related to the number of videos watched (β = −0.003, 95% CI: −0.986 to 0.980, P = 0.10) or students’ perceptions that the videos improved their learning (β = 1.86, 95% CI: −1.23 to 4.95, P = 0.234). Despite the majority of students reporting that they felt viewing the neuroanatomy videos improved their learning; this was not supported by neuroanatomy test outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Event13th Annual Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists (ANZACA): “Artful Anatomy” - Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Duration: 7 Dec 20169 Dec 2016

Conference

Conference13th Annual Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists (ANZACA)
CountryAustralia
CityCanberra
Period7/12/169/12/16

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    Meyer, A., & Ardakani, E. M. (2017). Supplementing a neuroanatomical module with YouTube videos does not increase student learning outcomes.. Abstract from 13th Annual Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists (ANZACA), Canberra, Australia. https://doi.org/10.1002/ca.22949