Supplementation of a High-Fat Diet with Chlorogenic Acid Is Associated with Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Mice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome requires a greater need for therapeutic and prevention strategies. Higher coffee consumption is consistently associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in population studies. Dietary polyphenols have been linked to benefits on several features of the metabolic syndrome. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a major component of coffee, is one of the most consumed polyphenols in the diet. In our study, we conducted a controlled dietary intervention over 12 weeks in male mice. There were three dietary groups: (i) normal diet, (ii) high-fat diet, and (iii) high-fat diet + CGA. We assessed the effect of CGA at a physiologically obtainable dose (1 g/kg of diet) on high-fat-diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and also fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling in C57BL/6 male mice. Supplementation of CGA in the high-fat diet did not reduce body weight compared to mice fed the high-fat diet alone (p = 0.32). CGA resulted in increased insulin resistance compared to mice fed a high-fat diet only (p < 0.05). CGA resulted in decreased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (p < 0.001) and acetyl carboxylase β (ACCβ), a downstream target of AMPK (p < 0.05), in liver. The liver of mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with CGA had a higher lipid content (p < 0.05) and more steatosis relative to mice fed a high-fat diet only, indicating impaired fatty acid oxidation. This study suggests that CGA supplementation in a high-fat diet does not protect against features of the metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese mice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4371-4378
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume61
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Chlorogenic Acid
High Fat Diet
high fat diet
chlorogenic acid
Nutrition
insulin resistance
Insulin Resistance
Fats
Insulin
Lipids
liver
Liver
mice
lipids
metabolic syndrome
Diet
AMP-activated protein kinase
AMP-Activated Protein Kinases
beta oxidation
Coffee

Cite this

@article{a0439667d7464871ba0555ea917cfac2,
title = "Supplementation of a High-Fat Diet with Chlorogenic Acid Is Associated with Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Mice",
abstract = "The increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome requires a greater need for therapeutic and prevention strategies. Higher coffee consumption is consistently associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in population studies. Dietary polyphenols have been linked to benefits on several features of the metabolic syndrome. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a major component of coffee, is one of the most consumed polyphenols in the diet. In our study, we conducted a controlled dietary intervention over 12 weeks in male mice. There were three dietary groups: (i) normal diet, (ii) high-fat diet, and (iii) high-fat diet + CGA. We assessed the effect of CGA at a physiologically obtainable dose (1 g/kg of diet) on high-fat-diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and also fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling in C57BL/6 male mice. Supplementation of CGA in the high-fat diet did not reduce body weight compared to mice fed the high-fat diet alone (p = 0.32). CGA resulted in increased insulin resistance compared to mice fed a high-fat diet only (p < 0.05). CGA resulted in decreased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (p < 0.001) and acetyl carboxylase β (ACCβ), a downstream target of AMPK (p < 0.05), in liver. The liver of mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with CGA had a higher lipid content (p < 0.05) and more steatosis relative to mice fed a high-fat diet only, indicating impaired fatty acid oxidation. This study suggests that CGA supplementation in a high-fat diet does not protect against features of the metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese mice.",
author = "Aidilla Mubarak and Jonathan Hodgson and Michael Considine and Kevin Croft and Vance Mathews",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1021/jf400920x",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "4371--4378",
journal = "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry",
issn = "0021-8561",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "18",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Supplementation of a High-Fat Diet with Chlorogenic Acid Is Associated with Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Mice

AU - Mubarak, Aidilla

AU - Hodgson, Jonathan

AU - Considine, Michael

AU - Croft, Kevin

AU - Mathews, Vance

PY - 2013/4/15

Y1 - 2013/4/15

N2 - The increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome requires a greater need for therapeutic and prevention strategies. Higher coffee consumption is consistently associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in population studies. Dietary polyphenols have been linked to benefits on several features of the metabolic syndrome. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a major component of coffee, is one of the most consumed polyphenols in the diet. In our study, we conducted a controlled dietary intervention over 12 weeks in male mice. There were three dietary groups: (i) normal diet, (ii) high-fat diet, and (iii) high-fat diet + CGA. We assessed the effect of CGA at a physiologically obtainable dose (1 g/kg of diet) on high-fat-diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and also fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling in C57BL/6 male mice. Supplementation of CGA in the high-fat diet did not reduce body weight compared to mice fed the high-fat diet alone (p = 0.32). CGA resulted in increased insulin resistance compared to mice fed a high-fat diet only (p < 0.05). CGA resulted in decreased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (p < 0.001) and acetyl carboxylase β (ACCβ), a downstream target of AMPK (p < 0.05), in liver. The liver of mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with CGA had a higher lipid content (p < 0.05) and more steatosis relative to mice fed a high-fat diet only, indicating impaired fatty acid oxidation. This study suggests that CGA supplementation in a high-fat diet does not protect against features of the metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese mice.

AB - The increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome requires a greater need for therapeutic and prevention strategies. Higher coffee consumption is consistently associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in population studies. Dietary polyphenols have been linked to benefits on several features of the metabolic syndrome. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a major component of coffee, is one of the most consumed polyphenols in the diet. In our study, we conducted a controlled dietary intervention over 12 weeks in male mice. There were three dietary groups: (i) normal diet, (ii) high-fat diet, and (iii) high-fat diet + CGA. We assessed the effect of CGA at a physiologically obtainable dose (1 g/kg of diet) on high-fat-diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and also fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling in C57BL/6 male mice. Supplementation of CGA in the high-fat diet did not reduce body weight compared to mice fed the high-fat diet alone (p = 0.32). CGA resulted in increased insulin resistance compared to mice fed a high-fat diet only (p < 0.05). CGA resulted in decreased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (p < 0.001) and acetyl carboxylase β (ACCβ), a downstream target of AMPK (p < 0.05), in liver. The liver of mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with CGA had a higher lipid content (p < 0.05) and more steatosis relative to mice fed a high-fat diet only, indicating impaired fatty acid oxidation. This study suggests that CGA supplementation in a high-fat diet does not protect against features of the metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese mice.

U2 - 10.1021/jf400920x

DO - 10.1021/jf400920x

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 4371

EP - 4378

JO - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

JF - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

SN - 0021-8561

IS - 18

ER -