Supination and Pronation Strength Deficits Persist at 2-4 Years after Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures

J. Ploegmakers, B. The, Allan Wang, Mike Brutty, Tim Ackland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forearm rotation is a key function in the upper extremity. Following distal radius fracture, residual disability may occur in tasks requiring forearm rotation. The objectives of this study are to define pronation and supination strength profiles tested through the range of forearm rotation in normal individuals, and to evaluate the rotational strength profiles and rotational strength deficits across the testing range in a cohort of patients treated for distal radius fracture associated with an ulnar styloid base fracture. In a normative cohort of 29 subjects the supination strength profile showed an increasing linear relationship from supination to pronation. Twelve subjects were evaluated 2-4 years after anatomical open reduction and volar plate fixation of a distal radius fracture. The injured wrist was consistently weaker (corrected for hand dominance) in both supination and pronation strength in all testing positions, with the greatest loss in 60 degrees supination. Mean supination strength loss across all testing positions was significantly correlated with worse PRWE scores, highlighting the importance of supination in wrist function.

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