Student Conceptions of Learning and their use of Self-Regulated Learning Strategies: A Cross-Cultural Comparison

Graham Douglas, J.A. Hattie, N. Purdie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

176 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines differences between Australian and Japanese secondary school students' conceptions of learning and their use of self-regulated learning strategies. Australian students have a narrow, school-based view of learning. The Japanese students view learning from a much broader perspective. For them, learning is not only related to what happens at school, it is also seen as a lifelong, experiential process leading to personal fulfillment. However, in spite of these differences in learning conceptualizations, the strategies used by students in a Western learning context are similar to those used by Japanese students. A conception of learning as ''understanding'' is associated with a greater total use of strategies for both Australian and Japanese students.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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