Structural Collapse of the Hydroquinone–Formic Acid Clathrate: A Pressure-Medium-Dependent Phase Transition

E. Eikeland, M.K. Thomsen, S.R. Madsen, J. Overgaard, Mark Spackman, B.B. Iversen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

© 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. The energy landscape governing a new pressure-induced phase transition in the hydroquinone-formic acid clathrate is reported in which the host structure collapses, opening up the cavity channels within which the guest molecules migrate and order. The reversible isosymmetric phase transition causes significant changes in the morphology and the birefringence of the crystal. The subtle intermolecular interaction energies in the clathrate are quantified at varying pressures using novel model energies and energy frameworks. These calculations show that the high-pressure phase forms a more stable host network at the expense of less-stable host-guest interactions. The phase transition can be kinetically hindered using a nonhydrostatic pressure-transmitting medium, enabling the comparison of intermolecular energies in two polymorphic structures in the same pressure range. Overall this study illustrates a need for accurate intermolecular energies when analyzing self-assembly structures and supramolecular aggregates. The energy landscape governing a new pressure-induced phase transition in the hydroquinone-formic acid clathrate is reported in which the host structure collapses, opening up the cavity channels within which the guest molecules migrate and order (see figure). This study illustrates a need for accurate intermolecular energies when analyzing self-assembly structures and supramolecular aggregates.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4061-4069
Number of pages9
JournalChemistry - A European Journal
Volume22
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Mar 2016

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