'Stone Walls Do Not a Prison Make’: Bare Life and the Carceral Archipelago in Colonial and Postcolonial Societies

Harry Blagg, Thalia Anthony

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

Abstract

This chapter offers a ‘contrapuntal’ reading of Australian prisons as exclusive sites of settler colonial repression. We refer to transcripts from 2016 to 2017 Royal Commission into Child Protection and Youth Detention in the Northern Territory to reveal how the brutal treatment of Indigenous children in prisons is part of the same continuum of racism that reduces Indigenous lives to ‘bare life’. Imprisonment is not an exceptional state of un-being for Indigenous people. Rather, in the colony, the exception is the norm. The rights for Indigenous people cannot be afforded individually but need to recognise and account for Indigenous dispossession, state domination and Indigenous sovereign claims. Penal abolitionism can only be meaningful within a process that decolonizes other sites of exception for Indigenous people.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHuman Rights and Incarceration
Subtitle of host publicationCritical Explorations
EditorsElizabeth Stanley
Place of PublicationUK
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter11
Pages257-283
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-319-95399-1
ISBN (Print)9783319953984
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Publication series

NamePalgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology
PublisherPalgrave

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of ''Stone Walls Do Not a Prison Make’: Bare Life and the Carceral Archipelago in Colonial and Postcolonial Societies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Blagg, H., & Anthony, T. (2018). 'Stone Walls Do Not a Prison Make’: Bare Life and the Carceral Archipelago in Colonial and Postcolonial Societies. In E. Stanley (Ed.), Human Rights and Incarceration: Critical Explorations (pp. 257-283). (Palgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology). Palgrave Macmillan.