Stiffness degradation and damping of carbonate and silica sands

J. Antonio Carraro, M.S. Bortolotto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, London. Stiffness and damping are some of the most important dynamic properties affecting wave propagation and small-strain response of soils. While these properties are useful in many geotechnical analyses, they are particularly relevant in analyses relying on the rigorous understanding of the mechanical behaviour of cyclically loaded soils, such as those affected by waves, wind loads and earthquakes. A fundamental understanding of such properties for offshore calcareous sediments still lacks as rigorous characterization of such properties is less established for these materials. In this study, a state-of-the-art resonant column apparatus is used to characterise the stiffness degradation and damping of a carbonate sand from the North West shelf of Australia. A silica sand with particle size distribution identical to that of the carbonate sand tested was also used to allow for the effect of soil mineralogy to be quantified. State variables such as density and mean effective stress were varied systematically to assess their effect on the stiffness degradation and damping ratio of the soils tested. Solid cylindrical specimens were subjected to mean effective stresses up to about 2MPas during the tests. Changes in particle size distribution were monitored to quantify particle breakage, which was shown to be higher for the carbonate sand than for the silica sand tested. At similar initial states of density and stress, increasing shear strains leads to a decrease in stiffness and corresponding increase in damping of the soils tested, as expected. However, the rate of stiffness degradation was always higher for the carbonate sand compared to its silica counterpart. At similar levels of stiffness degradation, the carbonate sand system-atically shows higher damping ratio than the silica sand.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrontiers in Offshore Geotechnics III
Place of PublicationLondon, UK
PublisherCRC Press/Balkema
Pages1179-1183
Volume2015
ISBN (Print)9781138028487
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event3rd International Symposium on Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics - Norway, Oslo, Norway
Duration: 10 Jun 201512 Jun 2015
Conference number: 3

Conference

Conference3rd International Symposium on Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics
Abbreviated titleISFOG
CountryNorway
CityOslo
Period10/06/1512/06/15

Fingerprint

damping
stiffness
silica
carbonate
degradation
sand
effective stress
soil
dynamic property
shear strain
wind wave
breakage
wave propagation
particle size
earthquake
sediment

Cite this

Carraro, J. A., & Bortolotto, M. S. (2015). Stiffness degradation and damping of carbonate and silica sands. In Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics III (Vol. 2015, pp. 1179-1183). London, UK: CRC Press/Balkema.
Carraro, J. Antonio ; Bortolotto, M.S. / Stiffness degradation and damping of carbonate and silica sands. Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics III. Vol. 2015 London, UK : CRC Press/Balkema, 2015. pp. 1179-1183
@inproceedings{f0d47d6e43b8479fb97fc35768f5bb7e,
title = "Stiffness degradation and damping of carbonate and silica sands",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, London. Stiffness and damping are some of the most important dynamic properties affecting wave propagation and small-strain response of soils. While these properties are useful in many geotechnical analyses, they are particularly relevant in analyses relying on the rigorous understanding of the mechanical behaviour of cyclically loaded soils, such as those affected by waves, wind loads and earthquakes. A fundamental understanding of such properties for offshore calcareous sediments still lacks as rigorous characterization of such properties is less established for these materials. In this study, a state-of-the-art resonant column apparatus is used to characterise the stiffness degradation and damping of a carbonate sand from the North West shelf of Australia. A silica sand with particle size distribution identical to that of the carbonate sand tested was also used to allow for the effect of soil mineralogy to be quantified. State variables such as density and mean effective stress were varied systematically to assess their effect on the stiffness degradation and damping ratio of the soils tested. Solid cylindrical specimens were subjected to mean effective stresses up to about 2MPas during the tests. Changes in particle size distribution were monitored to quantify particle breakage, which was shown to be higher for the carbonate sand than for the silica sand tested. At similar initial states of density and stress, increasing shear strains leads to a decrease in stiffness and corresponding increase in damping of the soils tested, as expected. However, the rate of stiffness degradation was always higher for the carbonate sand compared to its silica counterpart. At similar levels of stiffness degradation, the carbonate sand system-atically shows higher damping ratio than the silica sand.",
author = "Carraro, {J. Antonio} and M.S. Bortolotto",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781138028487",
volume = "2015",
pages = "1179--1183",
booktitle = "Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics III",
publisher = "CRC Press/Balkema",

}

Carraro, JA & Bortolotto, MS 2015, Stiffness degradation and damping of carbonate and silica sands. in Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics III. vol. 2015, CRC Press/Balkema, London, UK, pp. 1179-1183, 3rd International Symposium on Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics , Oslo, Norway, 10/06/15.

Stiffness degradation and damping of carbonate and silica sands. / Carraro, J. Antonio; Bortolotto, M.S.

Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics III. Vol. 2015 London, UK : CRC Press/Balkema, 2015. p. 1179-1183.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

TY - GEN

T1 - Stiffness degradation and damping of carbonate and silica sands

AU - Carraro, J. Antonio

AU - Bortolotto, M.S.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, London. Stiffness and damping are some of the most important dynamic properties affecting wave propagation and small-strain response of soils. While these properties are useful in many geotechnical analyses, they are particularly relevant in analyses relying on the rigorous understanding of the mechanical behaviour of cyclically loaded soils, such as those affected by waves, wind loads and earthquakes. A fundamental understanding of such properties for offshore calcareous sediments still lacks as rigorous characterization of such properties is less established for these materials. In this study, a state-of-the-art resonant column apparatus is used to characterise the stiffness degradation and damping of a carbonate sand from the North West shelf of Australia. A silica sand with particle size distribution identical to that of the carbonate sand tested was also used to allow for the effect of soil mineralogy to be quantified. State variables such as density and mean effective stress were varied systematically to assess their effect on the stiffness degradation and damping ratio of the soils tested. Solid cylindrical specimens were subjected to mean effective stresses up to about 2MPas during the tests. Changes in particle size distribution were monitored to quantify particle breakage, which was shown to be higher for the carbonate sand than for the silica sand tested. At similar initial states of density and stress, increasing shear strains leads to a decrease in stiffness and corresponding increase in damping of the soils tested, as expected. However, the rate of stiffness degradation was always higher for the carbonate sand compared to its silica counterpart. At similar levels of stiffness degradation, the carbonate sand system-atically shows higher damping ratio than the silica sand.

AB - © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, London. Stiffness and damping are some of the most important dynamic properties affecting wave propagation and small-strain response of soils. While these properties are useful in many geotechnical analyses, they are particularly relevant in analyses relying on the rigorous understanding of the mechanical behaviour of cyclically loaded soils, such as those affected by waves, wind loads and earthquakes. A fundamental understanding of such properties for offshore calcareous sediments still lacks as rigorous characterization of such properties is less established for these materials. In this study, a state-of-the-art resonant column apparatus is used to characterise the stiffness degradation and damping of a carbonate sand from the North West shelf of Australia. A silica sand with particle size distribution identical to that of the carbonate sand tested was also used to allow for the effect of soil mineralogy to be quantified. State variables such as density and mean effective stress were varied systematically to assess their effect on the stiffness degradation and damping ratio of the soils tested. Solid cylindrical specimens were subjected to mean effective stresses up to about 2MPas during the tests. Changes in particle size distribution were monitored to quantify particle breakage, which was shown to be higher for the carbonate sand than for the silica sand tested. At similar initial states of density and stress, increasing shear strains leads to a decrease in stiffness and corresponding increase in damping of the soils tested, as expected. However, the rate of stiffness degradation was always higher for the carbonate sand compared to its silica counterpart. At similar levels of stiffness degradation, the carbonate sand system-atically shows higher damping ratio than the silica sand.

UR - https://www.crcpress.com/Frontiers-in-Offshore-Geotechnics-III/Meyer/p/book/9781138028487

M3 - Conference paper

SN - 9781138028487

VL - 2015

SP - 1179

EP - 1183

BT - Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics III

PB - CRC Press/Balkema

CY - London, UK

ER -

Carraro JA, Bortolotto MS. Stiffness degradation and damping of carbonate and silica sands. In Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics III. Vol. 2015. London, UK: CRC Press/Balkema. 2015. p. 1179-1183