Stemphylium grey leaf spot disease of lupins in Western Australia

Arbab Ahmad

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    Abstract

    [Truncated abstract] One of the traditional principles of disease management is avoidance of the pathogen. This study was planned to investigate the parameters that could be used to develop strategies for avoiding Stemphylium grey leaf spot (GLS) disease of narrow-leafed lupins (NLL) in Western Australia (WA). To achieve this objective, the project was divided into four different components.
    Firstly, surveys of WA lupin growing regions were carried out over three years to ascertain the presence and distribution of virulent strains of the pathogen in the field. Secondly, the impact of virulent strains of the pathogen on grain yield of NLL was assessed. These two components were planned to investigate the importance of the disease to the Western Australian NLL crop in terms of distribution and potential impact on production. The third component focused on the environmental requirements of the disease. Temperature and moisture requirements for optimum growth of the pathogen and for establishment of infection were studied in vitro. These optimum requirements were then tested in a glasshouse under controlled conditions. During the fourth component, ability of the pathogen to infect other plants commonly found in WA and its persistence on the infested trash and infected seed was investigated to determine the survival strategy of the pathogen. Finally, a predictive risk model was developed for WA based on the available information.
    LanguageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    StateUnpublished - 2014

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    Stemphylium
    Lupinus
    Western Australia
    pathogens
    grey leaf spot disease
    disease control
    grain yield
    greenhouses
    crops
    seeds
    infection

    Cite this

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    title = "Stemphylium grey leaf spot disease of lupins in Western Australia",
    abstract = "[Truncated abstract] One of the traditional principles of disease management is avoidance of the pathogen. This study was planned to investigate the parameters that could be used to develop strategies for avoiding Stemphylium grey leaf spot (GLS) disease of narrow-leafed lupins (NLL) in Western Australia (WA). To achieve this objective, the project was divided into four different components. Firstly, surveys of WA lupin growing regions were carried out over three years to ascertain the presence and distribution of virulent strains of the pathogen in the field. Secondly, the impact of virulent strains of the pathogen on grain yield of NLL was assessed. These two components were planned to investigate the importance of the disease to the Western Australian NLL crop in terms of distribution and potential impact on production. The third component focused on the environmental requirements of the disease. Temperature and moisture requirements for optimum growth of the pathogen and for establishment of infection were studied in vitro. These optimum requirements were then tested in a glasshouse under controlled conditions. During the fourth component, ability of the pathogen to infect other plants commonly found in WA and its persistence on the infested trash and infected seed was investigated to determine the survival strategy of the pathogen. Finally, a predictive risk model was developed for WA based on the available information.",
    keywords = "Fungal isolates, Characterization, Yield loss assessment, Disease risk, Epidemiology, Disease model",
    author = "Arbab Ahmad",
    year = "2014",
    language = "English",

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    Stemphylium grey leaf spot disease of lupins in Western Australia. / Ahmad, Arbab.

    2014.

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    TY - THES

    T1 - Stemphylium grey leaf spot disease of lupins in Western Australia

    AU - Ahmad,Arbab

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - [Truncated abstract] One of the traditional principles of disease management is avoidance of the pathogen. This study was planned to investigate the parameters that could be used to develop strategies for avoiding Stemphylium grey leaf spot (GLS) disease of narrow-leafed lupins (NLL) in Western Australia (WA). To achieve this objective, the project was divided into four different components. Firstly, surveys of WA lupin growing regions were carried out over three years to ascertain the presence and distribution of virulent strains of the pathogen in the field. Secondly, the impact of virulent strains of the pathogen on grain yield of NLL was assessed. These two components were planned to investigate the importance of the disease to the Western Australian NLL crop in terms of distribution and potential impact on production. The third component focused on the environmental requirements of the disease. Temperature and moisture requirements for optimum growth of the pathogen and for establishment of infection were studied in vitro. These optimum requirements were then tested in a glasshouse under controlled conditions. During the fourth component, ability of the pathogen to infect other plants commonly found in WA and its persistence on the infested trash and infected seed was investigated to determine the survival strategy of the pathogen. Finally, a predictive risk model was developed for WA based on the available information.

    AB - [Truncated abstract] One of the traditional principles of disease management is avoidance of the pathogen. This study was planned to investigate the parameters that could be used to develop strategies for avoiding Stemphylium grey leaf spot (GLS) disease of narrow-leafed lupins (NLL) in Western Australia (WA). To achieve this objective, the project was divided into four different components. Firstly, surveys of WA lupin growing regions were carried out over three years to ascertain the presence and distribution of virulent strains of the pathogen in the field. Secondly, the impact of virulent strains of the pathogen on grain yield of NLL was assessed. These two components were planned to investigate the importance of the disease to the Western Australian NLL crop in terms of distribution and potential impact on production. The third component focused on the environmental requirements of the disease. Temperature and moisture requirements for optimum growth of the pathogen and for establishment of infection were studied in vitro. These optimum requirements were then tested in a glasshouse under controlled conditions. During the fourth component, ability of the pathogen to infect other plants commonly found in WA and its persistence on the infested trash and infected seed was investigated to determine the survival strategy of the pathogen. Finally, a predictive risk model was developed for WA based on the available information.

    KW - Fungal isolates

    KW - Characterization

    KW - Yield loss assessment

    KW - Disease risk

    KW - Epidemiology

    KW - Disease model

    M3 - Doctoral Thesis

    ER -