Stability and hydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during hydropyrolysis (HyPy) - Relevance for high maturity organic matter

H. Grotheer, Aileen Robert, Paul Greenwood, K. Grice

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A series of hydropyrolysis (HyPy) experiments have been conducted on a small suite of authentic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs: coronene, pyrene and perylene) to investigate the HyPy behaviour of these PAHs. This information may help in the interpretation of the structural significance of aromatic HyPy products, often detected in high abundance, from high maturity kerogens. The PAHs were separately treated by HyPy and were all susceptible to some extent of hydrogenation. Perylene also decomposed into low molecular weight aromatics (e.g. methylbiphenyls). Structurally, perylene is much less stable than the more condensed PAHs coronene and pyrene. The total product concentrations (wt% of starting PAH) from all HyPy experiments were consistently less than 100. wt%, probably due to either the condensation of semi-volatile products on walls of the transfer line prior to reaching the HyPy trap or the inefficient cold trapping of highly volatile products. Hydrogenation of PAHs was prevalent and was found to be significantly influenced by the addition of a Mo-S based catalyst and potentially the C/Mo ratio, but largely independent of the two final temperatures used (520. °C and 550. °C). The fully aromatised and hydrogenated products for any stable ring system may provide a general indication of the size distribution of aromatic units within the kerogen structure.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)45-54
    JournalOrganic Geochemistry
    Volume86
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
    Biological materials
    Hydrogenation
    PAH
    Perylene
    organic matter
    Kerogen
    kerogen
    pyrene
    Condensation
    Experiments
    trapping
    Molecular weight
    condensation
    experiment
    catalyst
    product
    Catalysts

    Cite this

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    title = "Stability and hydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during hydropyrolysis (HyPy) - Relevance for high maturity organic matter",
    abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A series of hydropyrolysis (HyPy) experiments have been conducted on a small suite of authentic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs: coronene, pyrene and perylene) to investigate the HyPy behaviour of these PAHs. This information may help in the interpretation of the structural significance of aromatic HyPy products, often detected in high abundance, from high maturity kerogens. The PAHs were separately treated by HyPy and were all susceptible to some extent of hydrogenation. Perylene also decomposed into low molecular weight aromatics (e.g. methylbiphenyls). Structurally, perylene is much less stable than the more condensed PAHs coronene and pyrene. The total product concentrations (wt{\%} of starting PAH) from all HyPy experiments were consistently less than 100. wt{\%}, probably due to either the condensation of semi-volatile products on walls of the transfer line prior to reaching the HyPy trap or the inefficient cold trapping of highly volatile products. Hydrogenation of PAHs was prevalent and was found to be significantly influenced by the addition of a Mo-S based catalyst and potentially the C/Mo ratio, but largely independent of the two final temperatures used (520. °C and 550. °C). The fully aromatised and hydrogenated products for any stable ring system may provide a general indication of the size distribution of aromatic units within the kerogen structure.",
    author = "H. Grotheer and Aileen Robert and Paul Greenwood and K. Grice",
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    language = "English",
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    Stability and hydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during hydropyrolysis (HyPy) - Relevance for high maturity organic matter. / Grotheer, H.; Robert, Aileen; Greenwood, Paul; Grice, K.

    In: Organic Geochemistry, Vol. 86, 2015, p. 45-54.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AB - © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A series of hydropyrolysis (HyPy) experiments have been conducted on a small suite of authentic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs: coronene, pyrene and perylene) to investigate the HyPy behaviour of these PAHs. This information may help in the interpretation of the structural significance of aromatic HyPy products, often detected in high abundance, from high maturity kerogens. The PAHs were separately treated by HyPy and were all susceptible to some extent of hydrogenation. Perylene also decomposed into low molecular weight aromatics (e.g. methylbiphenyls). Structurally, perylene is much less stable than the more condensed PAHs coronene and pyrene. The total product concentrations (wt% of starting PAH) from all HyPy experiments were consistently less than 100. wt%, probably due to either the condensation of semi-volatile products on walls of the transfer line prior to reaching the HyPy trap or the inefficient cold trapping of highly volatile products. Hydrogenation of PAHs was prevalent and was found to be significantly influenced by the addition of a Mo-S based catalyst and potentially the C/Mo ratio, but largely independent of the two final temperatures used (520. °C and 550. °C). The fully aromatised and hydrogenated products for any stable ring system may provide a general indication of the size distribution of aromatic units within the kerogen structure.

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