Spiritualized market subjectivity and new resistances: Russell Brand’s concept of revolution

Colleen Harmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Russell Brand’s sustained presence in the British media, his strong international social media following and increasing engagement with high-profile political figures in the U.K. situates him squarely in the public sphere as both active participant and critic. Despite the numerous criticisms and some support of his call for revolution, there has been a marked neglect of engagement with his concept of revolution. Through an analysis of the assemblage of the enunciation of Brand’s revolution in his 2013 interview with Jeremy Paxman and his book Revolution (2014) this article addresses this oversight, putting forward a Brand-specific concept of revolution. I argue further that this concept of revolution produces a spiritualized market subject. While this subject does remain part of the capitalist axiomatic, the brief release or deterritorialization that takes place with this type of spiritual revolution can change subjective dispositions. Thus, it is possible for the remediated subject to alter power distribution from within the capitalist system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-54
Number of pages12
JournalContinuum
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2017

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subjectivity
market
social media
disposition
Revolution
Russell Brand
Subjectivity
neglect
critic
criticism
interview

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Spiritualized market subjectivity and new resistances : Russell Brand’s concept of revolution. / Harmer, Colleen.

In: Continuum, Vol. 31, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 43-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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