Spiritual and political uses of a rock engraving site and its imagery by San and Tswana-speakers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Evidence from Thaba Sione, a town and rock engraving site in the Bophutatswana District of the North West Province, South Africa, indicates that both the site and its imagery were and are involved in the spiritual and political lives of foragers and farmers. Thaba Sione constituted a hierophany where elements of forager and farmer belief and practice, particularly rain-making, appear to have been modified as a result of contiguity initiated with the movement of Bantu-speaking farmers into the area from at least 1 500 years ago. Today, local Tswana-speakers believe Thaba Sione to be a place of the ancestors and the town Chief and Zionist Christian Church members use the site and its imagery to posit and perpetuate a definite political identity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-67.
JournalSouth African Archaeological Bulletin
Volume50
Issue number161
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Spiritual and political uses of a rock engraving site and its imagery by San and Tswana-speakers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this