Spatial coordination of aluminium uptake, production of reactive oxygen species, callose production and wall rigidification in maize roots

D. L. Jones, E. B. Blancaflor, L. V. Kochian, S. Gilroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

178 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aluminium (Al) toxicity associated with acid soils represents one of the biggest limitations to crop production worldwide. Although Al specifically inhibits the elongation of root cells, the exact mechanism by which this growth reduction occurs remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of Al migration into roots of maize (Zea mays L.) and the production of the stress response compound callose. Using the Al-specific fluorescent probe morin, we demonstrate the gradual penetration of Al into roots. Al readily accumulates in the root's epidermal and outer cortical cell layers but does not readily penetrate into the inner cortex. After prolonged exposure times (12-24 h), Al had entered all areas of the root apex. The spatial and temporal accumulation of Al within the root is similarly matched by the production of the cell wall polymer callose, which is also highly localized to the epidermis and outer cortical region. Exposure to Al induced the rapid production of reactive oxygen species and induced a significant rigidification of the cell wall. Our results suggest that Al-induced root inhibition in maize occurs by rigidification of the epidermal layers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1309-1318
Number of pages10
JournalPlant, Cell and Environment
Volume29
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

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