Sound and Sight: An Exploratory Look at Saving Private Ryan through the Eye-tracking Lens

Jenny Robinson, Jane Stadler, Andrea Rassell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using eye tracking as a method to analyse how four subjects respond to the opening Omaha Beach landing scene in Saving Private Ryan (Steven Spielberg, 1998), this article draws on insights from cinema studies about the types of aesthetic techniques that may direct the audience’s attention along with findings about cognitive resource allocation in the field of media psychology to examine how viewers’ eyes track across film footage. In particular, this study examines differences when viewing the same film sequences with and without sound. The authors suggest that eye tracking on its own is a technological tool that can be used to both reveal individual differences in experiencing cinema as well as to find psychophysiologically governed patterns of audience engagement.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
JournalRefractory: a journal of entertainment media
Volume25
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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