Soil Bacterial Community Shifts Are Driven by Soil Nutrient Availability along a Teak Plantation Chronosequence in Tropical Forests in China

Zhi Yu, Kunnan Liang, Guihua Huang, Xianbang Wang, Mingping Lin, Yinglong Chen, Zaizhi Zhou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soil bacterial communities play crucial roles in ecosystem functions and biogeochemical cycles of fundamental elements and are sensitive to environmental changes. However, the response of soil bacterial communities to chronosequence in tropical ecosystems is still poorly understood. This study characterized the structures and co-occurrence patterns of soil bacterial communities in rhizosphere and bulk soils along a chronosequence of teak plantations and adjacent native grassland as control. Stand ages significantly shifted the structure of soil bacterial communities but had no significant impact on bacterial community diversity. Bacterial community diversity in bulk soils was significantly higher than that in rhizosphere soils. The number of nodes and edges in the bacterial co-occurrence network first increased and then decreased with the chronosequence. The number of strongly positive correlations per network was much higher than negative correlations. Available potassium, total potassium, and available phosphorus were significant factors influencing the structure of the bacterial community in bulk soils. In contrast, urease, total potassium, pH, and total phosphorus were significant factors affecting the structure of the bacterial community in the rhizosphere soils. These results indicate that available nutrients in the soil are the main drivers regulating soil bacterial community variation along a teak plantation chronosequence.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1329
Number of pages19
JournalBiology
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2021

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