Soil and tissue tests to predict the potassium requirements of canola in south-western Australia

R.F. Brennan, Michael Bolland

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The predominantly sandy soils of south-western Australia have become potassium (K) deficient for spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production due to the removal of K from soil in grain and hay. The K requirements of canola (rape, Brassica napus L.) grown in rotation with wheat on these soils are not known and were determined in the study reported here. Seed (grain) yield increases (responses) of canola to applications of fertiliser K occurred at sites where Colwell soil test K values (top 10 cm of soil) were < 60 mg/kg soil. Grain yield responses to applied K occurred when concentrations of K in dried shoots were < 45 g/kg for young plants 7 and 10 weeks after sowing and < 35 g/kg for 18 weeks after sowing. Application of fertiliser K had no significant effects on either oil or K concentrations in grain.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)675-679
    JournalAustralian Journal of Experimental Agriculture
    Volume46
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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