Socio-Economic Drivers of Adoption of Small-Scale Aquaculture in Indonesia

Amy Diedrich, Jessica Blythe, Elizabeth Petersen, Epsi Euriga, Anna Fatchiya, Takahiro Shimada, Clive Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aquaculture has a critical role in achieving the UN's Sustainable Development Goals of increasing benefits that low-income and least-developed countries derive from marine resources. Its capacity to deliver these outcomes is challenging, particularly for marginalized groups. This is especially true if the introduction of novel technologies is applied with incomplete understanding of socio-economic and bio-physical contexts. We examined what socio-economic factors affect people's perceptions of adoption of lobster aquaculture in rural households in Indonesia. We used multiple linear regression with model averaging to test the influence of five capital assets (human, social, natural, physical, and financial), including agency, equity, and household sensitivity, on people's perceived ability to adopt lobster aquaculture. Agency and sensitivity had the greatest influence on the dependent variable. We then used correlation analysis to develop a heuristic model of potential indirect causal mechanisms affecting people's perceptions of adoption. Our results point to the existence of a sensitivity trap', where more sensitive or marginalized households are less likely to engage in new economic opportunities. We emphasize the value of multifaceted programs for improving livelihoods, particularly for poorer, more vulnerable households as one way to support the UN's commitment to using aquaculture as a pathway to achieving sustainable development.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1543
Number of pages15
JournalSustainability
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Mar 2019

Cite this

Diedrich, A., Blythe, J., Petersen, E., Euriga, E., Fatchiya, A., Shimada, T., & Jones, C. (2019). Socio-Economic Drivers of Adoption of Small-Scale Aquaculture in Indonesia. Sustainability, 11(6), [1543]. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061543
Diedrich, Amy ; Blythe, Jessica ; Petersen, Elizabeth ; Euriga, Epsi ; Fatchiya, Anna ; Shimada, Takahiro ; Jones, Clive. / Socio-Economic Drivers of Adoption of Small-Scale Aquaculture in Indonesia. In: Sustainability. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. 6.
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Diedrich, A, Blythe, J, Petersen, E, Euriga, E, Fatchiya, A, Shimada, T & Jones, C 2019, 'Socio-Economic Drivers of Adoption of Small-Scale Aquaculture in Indonesia' Sustainability, vol. 11, no. 6, 1543. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061543

Socio-Economic Drivers of Adoption of Small-Scale Aquaculture in Indonesia. / Diedrich, Amy; Blythe, Jessica; Petersen, Elizabeth; Euriga, Epsi; Fatchiya, Anna; Shimada, Takahiro; Jones, Clive.

In: Sustainability, Vol. 11, No. 6, 1543, 02.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socio-Economic Drivers of Adoption of Small-Scale Aquaculture in Indonesia

AU - Diedrich, Amy

AU - Blythe, Jessica

AU - Petersen, Elizabeth

AU - Euriga, Epsi

AU - Fatchiya, Anna

AU - Shimada, Takahiro

AU - Jones, Clive

PY - 2019/3/2

Y1 - 2019/3/2

N2 - Aquaculture has a critical role in achieving the UN's Sustainable Development Goals of increasing benefits that low-income and least-developed countries derive from marine resources. Its capacity to deliver these outcomes is challenging, particularly for marginalized groups. This is especially true if the introduction of novel technologies is applied with incomplete understanding of socio-economic and bio-physical contexts. We examined what socio-economic factors affect people's perceptions of adoption of lobster aquaculture in rural households in Indonesia. We used multiple linear regression with model averaging to test the influence of five capital assets (human, social, natural, physical, and financial), including agency, equity, and household sensitivity, on people's perceived ability to adopt lobster aquaculture. Agency and sensitivity had the greatest influence on the dependent variable. We then used correlation analysis to develop a heuristic model of potential indirect causal mechanisms affecting people's perceptions of adoption. Our results point to the existence of a sensitivity trap', where more sensitive or marginalized households are less likely to engage in new economic opportunities. We emphasize the value of multifaceted programs for improving livelihoods, particularly for poorer, more vulnerable households as one way to support the UN's commitment to using aquaculture as a pathway to achieving sustainable development.

AB - Aquaculture has a critical role in achieving the UN's Sustainable Development Goals of increasing benefits that low-income and least-developed countries derive from marine resources. Its capacity to deliver these outcomes is challenging, particularly for marginalized groups. This is especially true if the introduction of novel technologies is applied with incomplete understanding of socio-economic and bio-physical contexts. We examined what socio-economic factors affect people's perceptions of adoption of lobster aquaculture in rural households in Indonesia. We used multiple linear regression with model averaging to test the influence of five capital assets (human, social, natural, physical, and financial), including agency, equity, and household sensitivity, on people's perceived ability to adopt lobster aquaculture. Agency and sensitivity had the greatest influence on the dependent variable. We then used correlation analysis to develop a heuristic model of potential indirect causal mechanisms affecting people's perceptions of adoption. Our results point to the existence of a sensitivity trap', where more sensitive or marginalized households are less likely to engage in new economic opportunities. We emphasize the value of multifaceted programs for improving livelihoods, particularly for poorer, more vulnerable households as one way to support the UN's commitment to using aquaculture as a pathway to achieving sustainable development.

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KW - adoption

KW - lobster

KW - small-scale aquaculture

KW - agency

KW - Indonesia

KW - LIVELIHOODS APPROACH

KW - BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY

KW - MODEL SELECTION

KW - BIOECONOMICS

KW - AGENCY

KW - POLICY

U2 - 10.3390/su11061543

DO - 10.3390/su11061543

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - Sustainability (Switzerland)

JF - Sustainability (Switzerland)

SN - 2071-1050

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ER -