Social manipulation of sperm competition intensity reduces seminal fluid gene expression

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 4 Citations

Abstract

A considerable body of evidence supports the prediction that males should increase their expenditure on the ejaculate in response to sperm competition risk. The prediction that they should reduce their expenditure with increasing sperm competition intensity is less well supported. Moreover, most studies have documented plasticity in sperm numbers. Here we show that male crickets Teleogryllus oceanicus exhibit reduced seminal fluid gene expression and accessory gland mass in response to elevated sperm competition intensity. Together with previous research, our findings suggest that strategic adjustments in seminal fluid composition contribute to competitive fertilization success in this species.
LanguageEnglish
Article number20170659
JournalBiology Letters
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 24 Jan 2018

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sperm competition
Spermatozoa
Health Expenditures
Gene Expression
gene expression
Teleogryllus oceanicus
Gryllidae
Sperm Count
prediction
fertilization (reproduction)
Fertilization
spermatozoa
Research
fluids

Cite this

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title = "Social manipulation of sperm competition intensity reduces seminal fluid gene expression",
abstract = "A considerable body of evidence supports the prediction that males should increase their expenditure on the ejaculate in response to sperm competition risk. The prediction that they should reduce their expenditure with increasing sperm competition intensity is less well supported. Moreover, most studies have documented plasticity in sperm numbers. Here we show that male crickets Teleogryllus oceanicus exhibit reduced seminal fluid gene expression and accessory gland mass in response to elevated sperm competition intensity. Together with previous research, our findings suggest that strategic adjustments in seminal fluid composition contribute to competitive fertilization success in this species.",
author = "Sloan, {Nadia S.} and Maxine Lovegrove and Simmons, {Leigh W.}",
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Social manipulation of sperm competition intensity reduces seminal fluid gene expression. / Sloan, Nadia S.; Lovegrove, Maxine; Simmons, Leigh W.

In: Biology Letters, Vol. 14, No. 1, 20170659, 24.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lovegrove,Maxine

AU - Simmons,Leigh W.

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