So ends this day: American whalers in Yaburara country, Dampier Archipelago

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Abstract

Research to document Aboriginal occupation across the Dampier Archipelago has also encountered the earliest archaeological evidence for the presence of American whalers in North West Australia. Inscriptions in the form of rock engravings made by the crews of the whaling ships Connecticut (1842) and Delta (1849) have been discovered on Rosemary and West Lewis Islands. These maritime inscriptions are uniquely superimposed over earlier Indigenous rock art motifs, appearing to represent distinct mark-making practices by the whalers on encountering an already-inscribed landscape, and thus providing insight into the earliest phases of North West Australia's colonial history. © Antiquity Publications Ltd, 2019.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)218-235
Number of pages18
JournalAntiquity: a quarterly review of archaeology
Volume93
Issue number367
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Feb 2019

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antiquity
art
history
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Rock Art
Antiquity
Ship
Archaeological Evidence
Appearings
Colonial History
Rock Engravings
Whaling
Motifs

Cite this

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title = "So ends this day: American whalers in Yaburara country, Dampier Archipelago",
abstract = "Research to document Aboriginal occupation across the Dampier Archipelago has also encountered the earliest archaeological evidence for the presence of American whalers in North West Australia. Inscriptions in the form of rock engravings made by the crews of the whaling ships Connecticut (1842) and Delta (1849) have been discovered on Rosemary and West Lewis Islands. These maritime inscriptions are uniquely superimposed over earlier Indigenous rock art motifs, appearing to represent distinct mark-making practices by the whalers on encountering an already-inscribed landscape, and thus providing insight into the earliest phases of North West Australia's colonial history. {\circledC} Antiquity Publications Ltd, 2019.",
keywords = "Archaeology, Rock art, Whaling, western australia, Australia and New Zealand, Historical archaeology",
author = "Alistair Paterson and Anderson Ross and Ken Mulvaney and {de Koning}, Sarah and Joseph Dortch and Josephine McDonald",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "18",
doi = "10.15184/aqy.2018.186",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "218--235",
journal = "Antiquity",
issn = "0003-598X",
publisher = "Antiquity Ltd",
number = "367",

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T1 - So ends this day

T2 - American whalers in Yaburara country, Dampier Archipelago

AU - Paterson, Alistair

AU - Ross, Anderson

AU - Mulvaney, Ken

AU - de Koning, Sarah

AU - Dortch, Joseph

AU - McDonald, Josephine

PY - 2019/2/18

Y1 - 2019/2/18

N2 - Research to document Aboriginal occupation across the Dampier Archipelago has also encountered the earliest archaeological evidence for the presence of American whalers in North West Australia. Inscriptions in the form of rock engravings made by the crews of the whaling ships Connecticut (1842) and Delta (1849) have been discovered on Rosemary and West Lewis Islands. These maritime inscriptions are uniquely superimposed over earlier Indigenous rock art motifs, appearing to represent distinct mark-making practices by the whalers on encountering an already-inscribed landscape, and thus providing insight into the earliest phases of North West Australia's colonial history. © Antiquity Publications Ltd, 2019.

AB - Research to document Aboriginal occupation across the Dampier Archipelago has also encountered the earliest archaeological evidence for the presence of American whalers in North West Australia. Inscriptions in the form of rock engravings made by the crews of the whaling ships Connecticut (1842) and Delta (1849) have been discovered on Rosemary and West Lewis Islands. These maritime inscriptions are uniquely superimposed over earlier Indigenous rock art motifs, appearing to represent distinct mark-making practices by the whalers on encountering an already-inscribed landscape, and thus providing insight into the earliest phases of North West Australia's colonial history. © Antiquity Publications Ltd, 2019.

KW - Archaeology

KW - Rock art

KW - Whaling

KW - western australia

KW - Australia and New Zealand

KW - Historical archaeology

U2 - 10.15184/aqy.2018.186

DO - 10.15184/aqy.2018.186

M3 - Review article

VL - 93

SP - 218

EP - 235

JO - Antiquity

JF - Antiquity

SN - 0003-598X

IS - 367

ER -