Smartphones in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: A systematic review

Sandra J. Hamilton, Belynda Mills, Eleanor M. Birch, Sandra C. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) and secondary prevention are effective components of evidence-based management for cardiac patients, resulting in improved clinical and behavioural outcomes. Mobile health (mHealth) is a rapidly growing health delivery method that has the potential to enhance CR and heart failure management. We undertook a systematic review to assess the evidence around mHealth interventions for CR and heart failure management for service and patient outcomes, cost effectiveness with a view to how mHealth could be utilized for rural, remote and Indigenous cardiac patients. Methods: A comprehensive search of databases using key terms was conducted for the years 2000 to August 2016 to identify randomised and non-randomised trials utilizing smartphone functionality and a model of care that included CR and heart failure management. Included studies were assessed for quality and risk of bias and data extraction was undertaken by two independent reviewers. Results: Nine studies described a mix of mHealth interventions for CR (5 studies) and heart failure (4 studies) in the following categories: feasibility, utility and uptake studies; and randomised controlled trials. Studies showed that mHealth delivery for CR and heart failure management is feasible with high rates of participant engagement, acceptance, usage, and adherence. Moreover, mHealth delivery of CR was as effective as traditional centre-based CR (TCR) with significant improvement in quality of life. Hospital utilization for heart failure patients showed inconsistent reductions. There was limited inclusion of rural participants. Conclusion: Mobile health delivery has the potential to improve access to CR and heart failure management for patients unable to attend TCR programs. Feasibility testing of culturally appropriate mHealth delivery for CR and heart failure management is required in rural and remote settings with subsequent implementation and evaluation into local health care services.

Original languageEnglish
Article number25
JournalBMC Cardiovascular Disorders
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Feb 2018

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Secondary Prevention
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Failure
Telemedicine
Smartphone
Cardiac Rehabilitation
Health Services
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Quality of Life

Cite this

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Smartphones in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease : A systematic review. / Hamilton, Sandra J.; Mills, Belynda; Birch, Eleanor M.; Thompson, Sandra C.

In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, Vol. 18, No. 1, 25, 07.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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