Small effects of deferment of annual pastures through grazing spring wheat crops in Western Australia can benefit livestock productivity

Dean Thomas, A.D. Moore, Hayley Norman, Clinton Revell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

© 2015 CSIRO. Grazing sheep on cereal crops in winter has become widely adopted in medium-high-rainfall zones of Australia. Interest in this practice has spread to the lower rainfall parts of the cereal-livestock zone where it is being applied to shorter season crop varieties. A farm-system modelling study was conducted to investigate the value of deferment of annual pastures by grazing spring wheat in their place. The biophysical simulation model, based on a representative wheat and sheep farming system in the wheatbelt of Western Australia, involved two grazing-management scenarios and used climate data for the period 1962-2011 for three locations in Western Australia representing low-, medium-and high-rainfall cropping regions: Merredin, Wickepin and Kojonup. The grazing-management policy of the main scenario, 'crop grazing', placed livestock on the crops only until the crop reached Zadoks growth stage 30, provided the green biomass of the farm's annual pastures was
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-417
JournalCrop and Pasture Science
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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