Sleep in children with autism spectrum disorder longitudinal and cross-sectional investigations

Amelia Host

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Sleep problems are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with poor sleep associated with core clinical symptoms, cognition, and daytime behaviours. Currently, there remain inconsistencies in findings across methods to assess sleep and few studies have examined the cognitive and behavioural sequelae of poor sleep in detail. The current thesis examined the tools used to assess sleep and investigate the relationships between sleep and daytime features of ASD. Overall, parental reports of sleep problems are high and enduring over time; however, few differences emerge between ASD and TD groups in objectively assessed sleep parameters. Given discrepancies, alternative explanations for the association between parent-rated sleep and daytime behaviours were considered.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Thesis sponsors
Award date30 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2019

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Sleep
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Cognition

Cite this

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abstract = "Sleep problems are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with poor sleep associated with core clinical symptoms, cognition, and daytime behaviours. Currently, there remain inconsistencies in findings across methods to assess sleep and few studies have examined the cognitive and behavioural sequelae of poor sleep in detail. The current thesis examined the tools used to assess sleep and investigate the relationships between sleep and daytime features of ASD. Overall, parental reports of sleep problems are high and enduring over time; however, few differences emerge between ASD and TD groups in objectively assessed sleep parameters. Given discrepancies, alternative explanations for the association between parent-rated sleep and daytime behaviours were considered.",
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Sleep in children with autism spectrum disorder longitudinal and cross-sectional investigations. / Host, Amelia.

2019.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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