Significant Associations Between Sun Exposure and Adiposity Were Not Observed in Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients in a Cross-sectional Analysis

Gary D. Zhang, Lucinda J. Black, Matthew N. Cooper, Robyn M. Lucas, Shelley Gorman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Obesity is a significant health problem worldwide. Exposure to low-dose ultraviolet radiation (like that in sunlight) suppresses the development of obesity in mice; however, the nature of the associations between sun exposure and adiposity is not well understood in humans. The present study characterized cross-sectional relationships between sun exposure and adiposity in a convenience cohort of breast (n = 269; mean age = 58 years) and prostate (n = 78; mean age = 69 years) cancer patients. Participants were enrolled in a 3-month exercise program in Perth, Australia. Self-reported questionnaires measured time spent outdoors (previous week, winter and summer), sex, age, treatment received and physical activity levels. Adiposity measures included body mass index, waist-hip ratio and body fat percentage (measured via DXA). In unadjusted models, greater time spent outdoors across all times was significantly associated with lower waist-hip ratio, while greater time spent outdoors in the last winter was associated with lower body fat percentage, but not when stratified by sex. There were no statistically significant associations between time spent outdoors and adiposity after adjusting for sex, age, treatments received and physical activity. Longitudinal studies in larger populations may elucidate significant associations not found in our study due to the cross-sectional design and power limitations.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPhotochemistry and Photobiology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Adiposity
Solar System
breast
Sun
Prostatic Neoplasms
sun
Cross-Sectional Studies
cancer
Fats
Breast Neoplasms
obesity
Medical problems
Ultraviolet radiation
Waist-Hip Ratio
fats
Exercise
winter
Adipose Tissue
Obesity
Sunlight

Cite this

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title = "Significant Associations Between Sun Exposure and Adiposity Were Not Observed in Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients in a Cross-sectional Analysis",
abstract = "Obesity is a significant health problem worldwide. Exposure to low-dose ultraviolet radiation (like that in sunlight) suppresses the development of obesity in mice; however, the nature of the associations between sun exposure and adiposity is not well understood in humans. The present study characterized cross-sectional relationships between sun exposure and adiposity in a convenience cohort of breast (n = 269; mean age = 58 years) and prostate (n = 78; mean age = 69 years) cancer patients. Participants were enrolled in a 3-month exercise program in Perth, Australia. Self-reported questionnaires measured time spent outdoors (previous week, winter and summer), sex, age, treatment received and physical activity levels. Adiposity measures included body mass index, waist-hip ratio and body fat percentage (measured via DXA). In unadjusted models, greater time spent outdoors across all times was significantly associated with lower waist-hip ratio, while greater time spent outdoors in the last winter was associated with lower body fat percentage, but not when stratified by sex. There were no statistically significant associations between time spent outdoors and adiposity after adjusting for sex, age, treatments received and physical activity. Longitudinal studies in larger populations may elucidate significant associations not found in our study due to the cross-sectional design and power limitations.",
author = "Zhang, {Gary D.} and Black, {Lucinda J.} and Cooper, {Matthew N.} and Lucas, {Robyn M.} and Shelley Gorman",
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AU - Lucas, Robyn M.

AU - Gorman, Shelley

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N2 - Obesity is a significant health problem worldwide. Exposure to low-dose ultraviolet radiation (like that in sunlight) suppresses the development of obesity in mice; however, the nature of the associations between sun exposure and adiposity is not well understood in humans. The present study characterized cross-sectional relationships between sun exposure and adiposity in a convenience cohort of breast (n = 269; mean age = 58 years) and prostate (n = 78; mean age = 69 years) cancer patients. Participants were enrolled in a 3-month exercise program in Perth, Australia. Self-reported questionnaires measured time spent outdoors (previous week, winter and summer), sex, age, treatment received and physical activity levels. Adiposity measures included body mass index, waist-hip ratio and body fat percentage (measured via DXA). In unadjusted models, greater time spent outdoors across all times was significantly associated with lower waist-hip ratio, while greater time spent outdoors in the last winter was associated with lower body fat percentage, but not when stratified by sex. There were no statistically significant associations between time spent outdoors and adiposity after adjusting for sex, age, treatments received and physical activity. Longitudinal studies in larger populations may elucidate significant associations not found in our study due to the cross-sectional design and power limitations.

AB - Obesity is a significant health problem worldwide. Exposure to low-dose ultraviolet radiation (like that in sunlight) suppresses the development of obesity in mice; however, the nature of the associations between sun exposure and adiposity is not well understood in humans. The present study characterized cross-sectional relationships between sun exposure and adiposity in a convenience cohort of breast (n = 269; mean age = 58 years) and prostate (n = 78; mean age = 69 years) cancer patients. Participants were enrolled in a 3-month exercise program in Perth, Australia. Self-reported questionnaires measured time spent outdoors (previous week, winter and summer), sex, age, treatment received and physical activity levels. Adiposity measures included body mass index, waist-hip ratio and body fat percentage (measured via DXA). In unadjusted models, greater time spent outdoors across all times was significantly associated with lower waist-hip ratio, while greater time spent outdoors in the last winter was associated with lower body fat percentage, but not when stratified by sex. There were no statistically significant associations between time spent outdoors and adiposity after adjusting for sex, age, treatments received and physical activity. Longitudinal studies in larger populations may elucidate significant associations not found in our study due to the cross-sectional design and power limitations.

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