Shelf and slope processes offshore Fremantle, Western Australia

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

    Abstract

    The continental shelf and slope region off Fremantle, Western Australia, is unique compared with other continental shelves. The anomalous Leeuwin current dominates the circulation at the shelf edge and offshore, and transports warm, nutrient-poor water poleward. On the continental shelf, the wind forces the circulation, with coastally trapped waves also contributing. The presence of offshore islands and a submarine canyon make the system more complex. Thus an ocean observation system to monitor this unique physical/biological oceanographic system would provide exciting opportunities for undertaking process studies. This observation system includes HF radar systems, autonomous ocean gliders and moored instruments.
    In this presentation, integrated data from these systems will be used to examine the upwelling/downwelling processes in the presence of topography. The Leeuwin current creates a downwelling environment along the shelf break; however, the topography (Perth submarine canyon and Rottnest Island) and strong summer winds cause localized upwelling. In autumn and winter, higher density inner shelf waters, resulting from high evaporation during the summer and then cooling exit the shelf as higher density bottom plumes. A major feature revealed in the ocean glider data, and visible in satellite images, was the presence of vertically mixed water at the shelf edge, which increased the primary production. Thus the observation system (‘pre- operational system’) provides a great opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the physical processes and their relationship to biological processes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages46–46
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 2008
    EventFourteenth Biennial International Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference - Liverpool, United Kingdom
    Duration: 25 Aug 200829 Aug 2008

    Conference

    ConferenceFourteenth Biennial International Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference
    Abbreviated titlePECS
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityLiverpool
    Period25/08/0829/08/08

    Fingerprint

    shelf break
    continental shelf
    submarine canyon
    downwelling
    upwelling
    ocean
    topography
    trapped wave
    summer
    continental slope
    biological processes
    water
    primary production
    plume
    evaporation
    autumn
    radar
    cooling
    nutrient
    winter

    Cite this

    Pattiaratchi, C. (2008). Shelf and slope processes offshore Fremantle, Western Australia. 46–46. Abstract from Fourteenth Biennial International Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Pattiaratchi, Charitha. / Shelf and slope processes offshore Fremantle, Western Australia. Abstract from Fourteenth Biennial International Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference, Liverpool, United Kingdom.1 p.
    @conference{568866b807d941b5bd6da5442c115608,
    title = "Shelf and slope processes offshore Fremantle, Western Australia",
    abstract = "The continental shelf and slope region off Fremantle, Western Australia, is unique compared with other continental shelves. The anomalous Leeuwin current dominates the circulation at the shelf edge and offshore, and transports warm, nutrient-poor water poleward. On the continental shelf, the wind forces the circulation, with coastally trapped waves also contributing. The presence of offshore islands and a submarine canyon make the system more complex. Thus an ocean observation system to monitor this unique physical/biological oceanographic system would provide exciting opportunities for undertaking process studies. This observation system includes HF radar systems, autonomous ocean gliders and moored instruments.In this presentation, integrated data from these systems will be used to examine the upwelling/downwelling processes in the presence of topography. The Leeuwin current creates a downwelling environment along the shelf break; however, the topography (Perth submarine canyon and Rottnest Island) and strong summer winds cause localized upwelling. In autumn and winter, higher density inner shelf waters, resulting from high evaporation during the summer and then cooling exit the shelf as higher density bottom plumes. A major feature revealed in the ocean glider data, and visible in satellite images, was the presence of vertically mixed water at the shelf edge, which increased the primary production. Thus the observation system (‘pre- operational system’) provides a great opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the physical processes and their relationship to biological processes.",
    author = "Charitha Pattiaratchi",
    year = "2008",
    language = "English",
    pages = "46–46",
    note = "Fourteenth Biennial International Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference, PECS ; Conference date: 25-08-2008 Through 29-08-2008",

    }

    Pattiaratchi, C 2008, 'Shelf and slope processes offshore Fremantle, Western Australia' Fourteenth Biennial International Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference, Liverpool, United Kingdom, 25/08/08 - 29/08/08, pp. 46–46.

    Shelf and slope processes offshore Fremantle, Western Australia. / Pattiaratchi, Charitha.

    2008. 46–46 Abstract from Fourteenth Biennial International Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

    TY - CONF

    T1 - Shelf and slope processes offshore Fremantle, Western Australia

    AU - Pattiaratchi, Charitha

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - The continental shelf and slope region off Fremantle, Western Australia, is unique compared with other continental shelves. The anomalous Leeuwin current dominates the circulation at the shelf edge and offshore, and transports warm, nutrient-poor water poleward. On the continental shelf, the wind forces the circulation, with coastally trapped waves also contributing. The presence of offshore islands and a submarine canyon make the system more complex. Thus an ocean observation system to monitor this unique physical/biological oceanographic system would provide exciting opportunities for undertaking process studies. This observation system includes HF radar systems, autonomous ocean gliders and moored instruments.In this presentation, integrated data from these systems will be used to examine the upwelling/downwelling processes in the presence of topography. The Leeuwin current creates a downwelling environment along the shelf break; however, the topography (Perth submarine canyon and Rottnest Island) and strong summer winds cause localized upwelling. In autumn and winter, higher density inner shelf waters, resulting from high evaporation during the summer and then cooling exit the shelf as higher density bottom plumes. A major feature revealed in the ocean glider data, and visible in satellite images, was the presence of vertically mixed water at the shelf edge, which increased the primary production. Thus the observation system (‘pre- operational system’) provides a great opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the physical processes and their relationship to biological processes.

    AB - The continental shelf and slope region off Fremantle, Western Australia, is unique compared with other continental shelves. The anomalous Leeuwin current dominates the circulation at the shelf edge and offshore, and transports warm, nutrient-poor water poleward. On the continental shelf, the wind forces the circulation, with coastally trapped waves also contributing. The presence of offshore islands and a submarine canyon make the system more complex. Thus an ocean observation system to monitor this unique physical/biological oceanographic system would provide exciting opportunities for undertaking process studies. This observation system includes HF radar systems, autonomous ocean gliders and moored instruments.In this presentation, integrated data from these systems will be used to examine the upwelling/downwelling processes in the presence of topography. The Leeuwin current creates a downwelling environment along the shelf break; however, the topography (Perth submarine canyon and Rottnest Island) and strong summer winds cause localized upwelling. In autumn and winter, higher density inner shelf waters, resulting from high evaporation during the summer and then cooling exit the shelf as higher density bottom plumes. A major feature revealed in the ocean glider data, and visible in satellite images, was the presence of vertically mixed water at the shelf edge, which increased the primary production. Thus the observation system (‘pre- operational system’) provides a great opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the physical processes and their relationship to biological processes.

    M3 - Abstract

    SP - 46

    EP - 46

    ER -

    Pattiaratchi C. Shelf and slope processes offshore Fremantle, Western Australia. 2008. Abstract from Fourteenth Biennial International Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference, Liverpool, United Kingdom.