Sharing John Blacking: The development of archival practices to support the repatriation and reunification of a historical ethnomusicological collection

Andrea Emberly, Jennifer Post

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperOther chapter contribution

Abstract

As ethnomusicological collections become accessible to individuals, communities, and institutions beyond the scope of the original collector, their contents are often repurposed, reimagined, and reinformed. With the growing engagement with repatriation by archives, individuals, and institutions, field recordings, fieldnotes, images, and other supporting materials offer tangible and intangible records of musical performance, context, and historical data to scholars and the communities that first offered their music for scholarly research. Drawing from the Vhavenda materials in the John Blacking collection housed at the University of Western Australia, this chapter uses two case studies, on children’s music and musical instruments, to explore some of the myriad issues surrounding the repatriation of a historical ethnomusicological collection. The goal is to help shape how future archivists, scholars, and communities engage with archiving and repatriating ethnomusicological collections.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Oxford handbook of musical repatriation
EditorsFrank Gunderson, Robert C. Lancefield, Bret Woods
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780190659806
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Repatriation
Reunification
Music
Collectors
Intangibles
Musical Instruments
Archiving
Archivists
Musical Performance
Western Australia
Field Recording

Cite this

Emberly, A., & Post, J. (2018). Sharing John Blacking: The development of archival practices to support the repatriation and reunification of a historical ethnomusicological collection. In F. Gunderson, R. C. Lancefield, & B. Woods (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of musical repatriation United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190659806.013.12
Emberly, Andrea ; Post, Jennifer. / Sharing John Blacking : The development of archival practices to support the repatriation and reunification of a historical ethnomusicological collection. The Oxford handbook of musical repatriation . editor / Frank Gunderson ; Robert C. Lancefield ; Bret Woods. United Kingdom : Oxford University Press, 2018.
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Emberly, A & Post, J 2018, Sharing John Blacking: The development of archival practices to support the repatriation and reunification of a historical ethnomusicological collection. in F Gunderson, RC Lancefield & B Woods (eds), The Oxford handbook of musical repatriation . Oxford University Press, United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190659806.013.12

Sharing John Blacking : The development of archival practices to support the repatriation and reunification of a historical ethnomusicological collection. / Emberly, Andrea; Post, Jennifer.

The Oxford handbook of musical repatriation . ed. / Frank Gunderson; Robert C. Lancefield; Bret Woods. United Kingdom : Oxford University Press, 2018.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperOther chapter contribution

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Emberly A, Post J. Sharing John Blacking: The development of archival practices to support the repatriation and reunification of a historical ethnomusicological collection. In Gunderson F, Lancefield RC, Woods B, editors, The Oxford handbook of musical repatriation . United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. 2018 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190659806.013.12