Sexual conflict and correlated evolution between male persistence and female resistance traits in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus

Liam R. Dougherty, Emile van Lieshout, Kathryn B. McNamara, Joe A. Moschilla, Göran Arnqvist, Leigh W. Simmons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic mating (or copulatory wounding) is an extreme form of sexual conflict whereby male genitalia physically harm females during mating. In such species females are expected to evolve counter-adaptations to reduce male-induced harm. Importantly, female counter-adaptations may include both genital and non-genital traits. In this study, we examine evolutionary associations between harmful male genital morphology and female reproductive tract morphology and immune function across 13 populations of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. We detected positive correlated evolution between the injuriousness of male genitalia and putative female resistance adaptations across populations. Moreover, we found evidence for a negative relationship between female immunity and population productivity, which suggests that investment in female resistance may be costly due to the resource trade-offs that are predicted between immunity and reproduction. Finally, the degree of female tract scarring (harm to females) was greater in those populations with both longer aedeagal spines and a thinner female tract lining. Our results are thus consistent with a sexual arms race, which is only apparent when both male and female traits are taken into account. Importantly, our study provides rare evidence for sexually antagonistic coevolution of male and female traits at the within-species level.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20170132
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume284
Issue number1855
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2017

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sexual conflict
Callosobruchus maculatus
Bruchidae
Beetles
Seed
Seeds
beetle
persistence
seed
Linings
Productivity
male genitalia
Male Genitalia
immunity
Population
Immunity
arms race
wounding
coevolution
genitalia

Cite this

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title = "Sexual conflict and correlated evolution between male persistence and female resistance traits in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus",
abstract = "Traumatic mating (or copulatory wounding) is an extreme form of sexual conflict whereby male genitalia physically harm females during mating. In such species females are expected to evolve counter-adaptations to reduce male-induced harm. Importantly, female counter-adaptations may include both genital and non-genital traits. In this study, we examine evolutionary associations between harmful male genital morphology and female reproductive tract morphology and immune function across 13 populations of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. We detected positive correlated evolution between the injuriousness of male genitalia and putative female resistance adaptations across populations. Moreover, we found evidence for a negative relationship between female immunity and population productivity, which suggests that investment in female resistance may be costly due to the resource trade-offs that are predicted between immunity and reproduction. Finally, the degree of female tract scarring (harm to females) was greater in those populations with both longer aedeagal spines and a thinner female tract lining. Our results are thus consistent with a sexual arms race, which is only apparent when both male and female traits are taken into account. Importantly, our study provides rare evidence for sexually antagonistic coevolution of male and female traits at the within-species level.",
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Sexual conflict and correlated evolution between male persistence and female resistance traits in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. / Dougherty, Liam R.; van Lieshout, Emile; McNamara, Kathryn B.; Moschilla, Joe A.; Arnqvist, Göran; Simmons, Leigh W.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 284, No. 1855, 20170132, 31.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Arnqvist, Göran

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