Sexual coevolution in the traumatically inseminating plant bug genus Coridromius

N. J. Tatarnic, G. Cassis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sexual conflict has recently been proposed as a driving force behind the rapid diversification of genitalia among sexually reproducing organisms. In traumatically inseminating insects, males stab females in the side of the body with needle-like genitalia, ejaculating into their body cavity. Such mating is costly to females and has led to the evolution of cost-reducing 'paragenitalia' in some species. Whereas some consider this evidence of sexually antagonistic coevolution, others remain unconvinced. Variation in the reproductive morphology of both sexes - particularly males - is alleged to be negligible, contradicting the expectations of a coevolutionary arms race. Here, we use a phylogeny of the traumatically inseminating plant bug genus Coridromius to show that external female paragenitalia have evolved multiply across the genus and are correlated with changes in male genital shape. This pattern is characteristic of an evolutionary arms race driven by sexual conflict.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1321-1326
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Sexual coevolution in the traumatically inseminating plant bug genus Coridromius'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this