Sex on the Rocks: genetic structure, pollen dispersal and mating patterns in Eucalyptus caesia

Nicole Bezemer

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Plants with anciently fragmented population structures may show distinct molecular ecological characteristics compared to recently fragmented populations, with important implications for conservation genetic management. I applied field-based experiments in combination with microsatellite genotyping to investigate genetic structure, pollen dispersal and mating patterns in E. caesia, a tree endemic on granite outcrops. I found that unique genotypes and localised clonality were present in most stands. Purging of genetic load and pollination by honeyeaters may have played a role in the species persistence, with the relative importance of these influences potentially varying among populations or across the evolutionary history of populations.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Hopper, Stephen, Supervisor
  • Roberts, Dave, Supervisor
  • Krauss, Siegfried, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date18 Mar 2020
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2020

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