Severity of OSA is an independent predictor of incident atrial fibrillation hospitalization in a large sleep-clinic cohort

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Abstract

© 2015 American College of Chest Physicians. Background: OSA is a common condition that has been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but there is a paucity of data from large longitudinal cohorts to establish whether OSA is a risk factor for AF independent of obesity and other established risk factors. Methods: We studied patients attending a sleep clinic referred for in-laboratory polysomnography for possible OSA between 1989 and 2001. Whole-population hospital data in Western Australia for 1970 to 2009 were linked to sleep study cases to determine incident AF hospitalization to 2009. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the independent association of OSA with incident AF. Results: Study case subjects (6,841) were predominantly middle aged (48.3 ± 12.5 years old) and men (77%), and 455 developed AF during a median 11.9 years of follow-up. Univariate predictors of AF included age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, valvular heart disease, coronary or peripheral artery disease, heart failure, and COPD (all P <.001). Aft er multivariable adjustment, independent predictors of incident AF were an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) > 5/h (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95% CI, 1.21-2.00), log (AHI 1 1) (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06-1.26), and log (time with oxygen saturation
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)945-952
Number of pages8
JournalChest
Volume148
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015

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Atrial Fibrillation
Sleep
Hospitalization
Heart Valve Diseases
Western Australia
Polysomnography
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Coronary Artery Disease
Heart Failure
Obesity
Regression Analysis
Oxygen
Hypertension
Population

Cite this

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title = "Severity of OSA is an independent predictor of incident atrial fibrillation hospitalization in a large sleep-clinic cohort",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 American College of Chest Physicians. Background: OSA is a common condition that has been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but there is a paucity of data from large longitudinal cohorts to establish whether OSA is a risk factor for AF independent of obesity and other established risk factors. Methods: We studied patients attending a sleep clinic referred for in-laboratory polysomnography for possible OSA between 1989 and 2001. Whole-population hospital data in Western Australia for 1970 to 2009 were linked to sleep study cases to determine incident AF hospitalization to 2009. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the independent association of OSA with incident AF. Results: Study case subjects (6,841) were predominantly middle aged (48.3 ± 12.5 years old) and men (77{\%}), and 455 developed AF during a median 11.9 years of follow-up. Univariate predictors of AF included age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, valvular heart disease, coronary or peripheral artery disease, heart failure, and COPD (all P <.001). Aft er multivariable adjustment, independent predictors of incident AF were an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) > 5/h (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95{\%} CI, 1.21-2.00), log (AHI 1 1) (HR, 1.15; 95{\%} CI, 1.06-1.26), and log (time with oxygen saturation",
author = "Gemma Cadby and Nigel Mcardle and Tom Briffa and David Hillman and L. Simpson and Matthew Knuiman and Joe Hung",
year = "2015",
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doi = "10.1378/chest.15-0229",
language = "English",
volume = "148",
pages = "945--952",
journal = "Chest: the cardiopulmonary and critical care journal",
issn = "0012-3692",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Severity of OSA is an independent predictor of incident atrial fibrillation hospitalization in a large sleep-clinic cohort

AU - Cadby, Gemma

AU - Mcardle, Nigel

AU - Briffa, Tom

AU - Hillman, David

AU - Simpson, L.

AU - Knuiman, Matthew

AU - Hung, Joe

PY - 2015/10

Y1 - 2015/10

N2 - © 2015 American College of Chest Physicians. Background: OSA is a common condition that has been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but there is a paucity of data from large longitudinal cohorts to establish whether OSA is a risk factor for AF independent of obesity and other established risk factors. Methods: We studied patients attending a sleep clinic referred for in-laboratory polysomnography for possible OSA between 1989 and 2001. Whole-population hospital data in Western Australia for 1970 to 2009 were linked to sleep study cases to determine incident AF hospitalization to 2009. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the independent association of OSA with incident AF. Results: Study case subjects (6,841) were predominantly middle aged (48.3 ± 12.5 years old) and men (77%), and 455 developed AF during a median 11.9 years of follow-up. Univariate predictors of AF included age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, valvular heart disease, coronary or peripheral artery disease, heart failure, and COPD (all P <.001). Aft er multivariable adjustment, independent predictors of incident AF were an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) > 5/h (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95% CI, 1.21-2.00), log (AHI 1 1) (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06-1.26), and log (time with oxygen saturation

AB - © 2015 American College of Chest Physicians. Background: OSA is a common condition that has been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but there is a paucity of data from large longitudinal cohorts to establish whether OSA is a risk factor for AF independent of obesity and other established risk factors. Methods: We studied patients attending a sleep clinic referred for in-laboratory polysomnography for possible OSA between 1989 and 2001. Whole-population hospital data in Western Australia for 1970 to 2009 were linked to sleep study cases to determine incident AF hospitalization to 2009. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the independent association of OSA with incident AF. Results: Study case subjects (6,841) were predominantly middle aged (48.3 ± 12.5 years old) and men (77%), and 455 developed AF during a median 11.9 years of follow-up. Univariate predictors of AF included age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, valvular heart disease, coronary or peripheral artery disease, heart failure, and COPD (all P <.001). Aft er multivariable adjustment, independent predictors of incident AF were an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) > 5/h (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95% CI, 1.21-2.00), log (AHI 1 1) (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06-1.26), and log (time with oxygen saturation

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DO - 10.1378/chest.15-0229

M3 - Article

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JO - Chest: the cardiopulmonary and critical care journal

JF - Chest: the cardiopulmonary and critical care journal

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