Serious games in education: Fact or fad?

Gillian McGregor, Emma Bartle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paperpeer-review

Abstract

The use of serious games in education is growing, particularly within the field of health professional training (Graafland, Schraagen, & Schijven, 2012; Wattanasoontorn, Boada, Garcia, & Sbert, 2013). Serious games aim to teach or train whilst simultaneously entertaining and engaging users (Hawn, 2009). Serious games are viewed as a useful methodology for enhancing student motivation for learning and engagement with material (Coates, 2005). Despite being heralded as a cutting edge innovation, research validating the efficacy of serious games demonstrates mixed results (Susi, Johannesson, & Backlund, 2007). A serious game to support training of professional post graduate psychology students was developed by the first author. This paper presents the results of two pilot studies comparing the learning and training experiences of students using the serious game as compared to those using a control serious game and teaching as usual, as an example of an application of serious games in post graduate education.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationASCILITE 2016 - Conference Proceedings - 33rd International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education: Show Me the Learning
Place of PublicationAdelaide
PublisherUniversity of South Australia
Pages409-411
Number of pages3
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes
Event33rd International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2016 - Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 27 Nov 201630 Nov 2016

Conference

Conference33rd International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2016
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period27/11/1630/11/16

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