Self-management interventions for skin care in people with a spinal cord injury: part 2—a systematic review of use of theory and quality of intervention reporting

Justine S. Baron, Katrina J. Sullivan, Jillian M. Swaine, Arlene Aspinall, Susan Jaglal, Justin Presseau, Dalton Wolfe, Jeremy M. Grimshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study design: Systematic review. Objectives: To examine use of theory and quality of reporting in skin care self-management interventions for people with SCI. Setting: International. Methods: The Theory Coding Scheme (TCS) and the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist were applied by two independent researchers to 17 interventions identified in a systematic review of self-management interventions for skin care in people with SCI. Results: Six (35%) of the 17 interventions reviewed were reported to have a theoretical basis. Theories used included three of the most commonly featured in health behavior research (the Health Belief Model, Social Cognitive Theory, and the Transtheoretical Model). In these six interventions, theory was used to design content but not to select participants or tailor strategies. None of the interventions were used to test theories in the SCI population, or to propose theoretical refinements. Reporting quality was found to vary by TIDieR item, with 6–100% of interventions including recommended information. Information on two intervention fidelity items was missing in 53 and 82% of descriptions. Conclusions: Use of theory and reporting quality in SCI self-management research remains suboptimal, potentially slowing down advancements in this area of research. Rehabilitation researchers should direct their efforts toward improving these practices to help build a science of SCI self-management that is cumulative and reproducible by clinicians, scientists, and policy makers. Sponsorship: This work was funded through a postdoctoral fellowship awarded to the first author by the Rick Hansen Institute.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)837-846
Number of pages10
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume56
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

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Skin Care
Self Care
Spinal Cord Injuries
Research
Research Personnel
Health Behavior
Administrative Personnel
Checklist
Rehabilitation
Health
Population

Cite this

Baron, Justine S. ; Sullivan, Katrina J. ; Swaine, Jillian M. ; Aspinall, Arlene ; Jaglal, Susan ; Presseau, Justin ; Wolfe, Dalton ; Grimshaw, Jeremy M. / Self-management interventions for skin care in people with a spinal cord injury : part 2—a systematic review of use of theory and quality of intervention reporting. In: Spinal Cord. 2018 ; Vol. 56, No. 9. pp. 837-846.
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title = "Self-management interventions for skin care in people with a spinal cord injury: part 2—a systematic review of use of theory and quality of intervention reporting",
abstract = "Study design: Systematic review. Objectives: To examine use of theory and quality of reporting in skin care self-management interventions for people with SCI. Setting: International. Methods: The Theory Coding Scheme (TCS) and the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist were applied by two independent researchers to 17 interventions identified in a systematic review of self-management interventions for skin care in people with SCI. Results: Six (35{\%}) of the 17 interventions reviewed were reported to have a theoretical basis. Theories used included three of the most commonly featured in health behavior research (the Health Belief Model, Social Cognitive Theory, and the Transtheoretical Model). In these six interventions, theory was used to design content but not to select participants or tailor strategies. None of the interventions were used to test theories in the SCI population, or to propose theoretical refinements. Reporting quality was found to vary by TIDieR item, with 6–100{\%} of interventions including recommended information. Information on two intervention fidelity items was missing in 53 and 82{\%} of descriptions. Conclusions: Use of theory and reporting quality in SCI self-management research remains suboptimal, potentially slowing down advancements in this area of research. Rehabilitation researchers should direct their efforts toward improving these practices to help build a science of SCI self-management that is cumulative and reproducible by clinicians, scientists, and policy makers. Sponsorship: This work was funded through a postdoctoral fellowship awarded to the first author by the Rick Hansen Institute.",
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Self-management interventions for skin care in people with a spinal cord injury : part 2—a systematic review of use of theory and quality of intervention reporting. / Baron, Justine S.; Sullivan, Katrina J.; Swaine, Jillian M.; Aspinall, Arlene; Jaglal, Susan; Presseau, Justin; Wolfe, Dalton; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.

In: Spinal Cord, Vol. 56, No. 9, 01.09.2018, p. 837-846.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-management interventions for skin care in people with a spinal cord injury

T2 - part 2—a systematic review of use of theory and quality of intervention reporting

AU - Baron, Justine S.

AU - Sullivan, Katrina J.

AU - Swaine, Jillian M.

AU - Aspinall, Arlene

AU - Jaglal, Susan

AU - Presseau, Justin

AU - Wolfe, Dalton

AU - Grimshaw, Jeremy M.

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