Selenium biofortification in lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus subsp. culinaris): Farmers' field survey and genotype×environment effect

Md Rahman, William Erskine, M.S. Zaman, P. Thavarajah, D. Thavarajah, Kadambot Siddique

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals, however more than one billion people around the world are Se deficient. Selenium helps to prevent several diseases in humans including arsenicosis, a major health problem in South Asia. Lentil is a popular staple food in South Asia; it can uptake Se from soil and is thus a potential source of Se for humans. A farmers' field survey and an on-station yield trial of seven advanced breeding lines at four locations were conducted in Bangladesh during 2010-11 to determine Se concentration in lentil. Total Se concentration was measured in soil and lentil seeds collected from both farmers' fields and yield trials. Mean of soil and lentil seed Se concentration in farmers' fields was 163μgkg-1 and 312μgkg-1, respectively, with the highest being 173μgkg-1 and 370μgkg-1 in Rajshahi division, a major lentil growing area in Bangladesh. Consumption of 50g of lentil provides 28% of the recommended daily allowance of Se (55μg per person per day). There were significant genotype and location differences observed for seed Se, Se yield, and seed yield. However, genotype×location interaction was not significant for seed Se and Se yield, but was significant for seed yield. Soil Se concentration in lentil growing regions of Bangladesh was moderate and overall it produced Se-rich lentils. Therefore, Se biofortification in lentil using agronomic and/or genetic approaches are possible to increase Se intake for Se deficient populations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1596-1604
JournalFood Research International
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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