Selection of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivar and growing site improves germination and uniformity for sprout production

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Abstract

Uniform imbibition and germination of field pea ( Pisum sativum L.) seeds is very important for sprout production for human consumption. The imbibition and germination of 3 cultivars of field pea, Dunwa, Dundale, and Helena, each grown at Mullewa, Merredin, and Scaddan in the grainbelt of Western Australia, were investigated in laboratory experiments. The ability of field pea to germinate was affected by cultivar and the environment under which seed development occurred on the parent plant. Averaged over locations, germination of the cv. Dundale (82%) was lower than of Dunwa (93%) or Helena (95%). Germination of seeds ranged from 85% for those grown at Merredin to 91% at Scaddan and 94% at Mullewa. The effect of growing location on germination was most pronounced in cv. Dundale from Merredin where the largest number of hard seeds was observed. Initial seed water content was positively (r(2) = 0.55*) correlated with germination across cultivars and sites. Small and large seeds within a seed lot with the same initial seed water content had a similar germination percentage. During imbibition, water entered the seed through the strophiole and this would be an appropriate place to look for a mechanism that affects imbibition. Careful selection of cultivar and favourable growing site should improve germination for the sprout producer.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1249-1257
JournalAustralian Journal of Agricultural Research
Volume57
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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Pisum sativum
peas
germination
imbibition
cultivars
seeds
water content
seed development
Western Australia
seed germination
water

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@article{e58843078c7042cd90aabccedd8f015d,
title = "Selection of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivar and growing site improves germination and uniformity for sprout production",
abstract = "Uniform imbibition and germination of field pea ( Pisum sativum L.) seeds is very important for sprout production for human consumption. The imbibition and germination of 3 cultivars of field pea, Dunwa, Dundale, and Helena, each grown at Mullewa, Merredin, and Scaddan in the grainbelt of Western Australia, were investigated in laboratory experiments. The ability of field pea to germinate was affected by cultivar and the environment under which seed development occurred on the parent plant. Averaged over locations, germination of the cv. Dundale (82{\%}) was lower than of Dunwa (93{\%}) or Helena (95{\%}). Germination of seeds ranged from 85{\%} for those grown at Merredin to 91{\%} at Scaddan and 94{\%} at Mullewa. The effect of growing location on germination was most pronounced in cv. Dundale from Merredin where the largest number of hard seeds was observed. Initial seed water content was positively (r(2) = 0.55*) correlated with germination across cultivars and sites. Small and large seeds within a seed lot with the same initial seed water content had a similar germination percentage. During imbibition, water entered the seed through the strophiole and this would be an appropriate place to look for a mechanism that affects imbibition. Careful selection of cultivar and favourable growing site should improve germination for the sprout producer.",
author = "C.J.F. Fowler and David Turner and Kadambot Siddique",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1071/AR06063",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "1249--1257",
journal = "Crop & Pasture Science",
issn = "1836-0947",
publisher = "CSIRO Publishing",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Selection of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivar and growing site improves germination and uniformity for sprout production

AU - Fowler, C.J.F.

AU - Turner, David

AU - Siddique, Kadambot

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Uniform imbibition and germination of field pea ( Pisum sativum L.) seeds is very important for sprout production for human consumption. The imbibition and germination of 3 cultivars of field pea, Dunwa, Dundale, and Helena, each grown at Mullewa, Merredin, and Scaddan in the grainbelt of Western Australia, were investigated in laboratory experiments. The ability of field pea to germinate was affected by cultivar and the environment under which seed development occurred on the parent plant. Averaged over locations, germination of the cv. Dundale (82%) was lower than of Dunwa (93%) or Helena (95%). Germination of seeds ranged from 85% for those grown at Merredin to 91% at Scaddan and 94% at Mullewa. The effect of growing location on germination was most pronounced in cv. Dundale from Merredin where the largest number of hard seeds was observed. Initial seed water content was positively (r(2) = 0.55*) correlated with germination across cultivars and sites. Small and large seeds within a seed lot with the same initial seed water content had a similar germination percentage. During imbibition, water entered the seed through the strophiole and this would be an appropriate place to look for a mechanism that affects imbibition. Careful selection of cultivar and favourable growing site should improve germination for the sprout producer.

AB - Uniform imbibition and germination of field pea ( Pisum sativum L.) seeds is very important for sprout production for human consumption. The imbibition and germination of 3 cultivars of field pea, Dunwa, Dundale, and Helena, each grown at Mullewa, Merredin, and Scaddan in the grainbelt of Western Australia, were investigated in laboratory experiments. The ability of field pea to germinate was affected by cultivar and the environment under which seed development occurred on the parent plant. Averaged over locations, germination of the cv. Dundale (82%) was lower than of Dunwa (93%) or Helena (95%). Germination of seeds ranged from 85% for those grown at Merredin to 91% at Scaddan and 94% at Mullewa. The effect of growing location on germination was most pronounced in cv. Dundale from Merredin where the largest number of hard seeds was observed. Initial seed water content was positively (r(2) = 0.55*) correlated with germination across cultivars and sites. Small and large seeds within a seed lot with the same initial seed water content had a similar germination percentage. During imbibition, water entered the seed through the strophiole and this would be an appropriate place to look for a mechanism that affects imbibition. Careful selection of cultivar and favourable growing site should improve germination for the sprout producer.

U2 - 10.1071/AR06063

DO - 10.1071/AR06063

M3 - Article

VL - 57

SP - 1249

EP - 1257

JO - Crop & Pasture Science

JF - Crop & Pasture Science

SN - 1836-0947

IS - 12

ER -