Securing an interprofessional future for Australian health professional education and practice

Roger Dunston, Ben Canny, Adrian Fisher, Dawn Forman, Monica Moran, Matthew Oates, Maree O'Keefe, Gary Rogers, Carole Steketee

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Abstract

Executive summary
Project context
The SIF Project is the eighth project in a series of Australian interprofessional
education (IPE) development and research projects – the Curriculum Renewal Studies Program – conducted over the past 10 years. The Curriculum Renewal Studies Program aimed to build new knowledge about IPE in Australia and explore ways in which this knowledge could be used to design and implement changes that would create an educational environment where all Australian health professional students would graduate with well-developed collaborative practice capabilities.
Whilst many examples of excellent IPE were identified across the Curriculum Renewal Studies Program, a number of serious barriers were also identified. These barriers included an over-dependence on local champions and circumstances, lack of agreed national standards, little or no national leadership, no agreed governance frameworks across educational providers or inter-sectoral partners, and significant dependence on short-term soft funding. Combined, these barriers created an environment of constraint and instability signifying that IPE would not and could not grow and sustain itself as a system-wide and system-owned accomplishment.
The current study, the SIF Project, differs from other curriculum renewal studies in its explicit focus on ‘implementation’ and ‘system development’ in order to overcome these identified systemic barriers
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherAIPPEN: Australasian Interprofessional Practice and Education Network
Commissioning bodyAustralian Government Department of Education and Training
Number of pages129
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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