Safe habitats: does the association between neighborhood crime and walking differ by neighborhood disadvantage?

Sarah Foster, Paula Hooper, Nicola W. Burton, Wendy J. Brown, Billie Giles-Corti, Jerome N. Rachele, Gavin Turrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interrelationships between neighborhood walkability, area disadvantage, and crime may contribute to the inconsistent associations between crime and walking. We examined associations between crime and walking, and tested for differences by neighborhood disadvantage while addressing these additional complexities. Participants (n = 6,680) from 200 neighborhoods spanning the most and least disadvantaged in Brisbane, Australia, completed a questionnaire and objective measures were generated for the individual-level 1,000-m neighborhood. Multilevel models examined associations between crime (perceived and objective) and walking (recreational and transport), and interactions tested for differences by neighborhood disadvantage. High perceived crime was associated with reduced odds of transport walking, whereas high objective crime was associated with increased odds of transport walking. Patterns did not differ by neighborhood disadvantage. In disadvantaged neighborhoods, the “negative” criminogenic attributes were insufficient to outweigh the “positive” walkability attributes, producing similar walking patterns to advantaged neighborhoods where residents were dislocated from local destinations but buffered from crime.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEnvironment and Behavior
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Jun 2019

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