S. aureus colonization in healthy Australian adults receiving an investigational S. aureus 3-antigen vaccine

Helen S. Marshall, James Baber, Peter Richmond, Michael Nissen, Sepehr Shakib, Barry N. Kreiswirth, Edward T. Zito, Joseph Severs, Joseph Eiden, William Gruber, Kathrin U. Jansen, C. Hal Jones, Annaliesa S. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Assess Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization in healthy Australian adults receiving an investigational S. aureus 3-antigen vaccine (SA3Ag). Methods: In this phase 1, double-blind, sponsor-unblinded study, participants were randomized to receive a single dose (1 of 3 dose levels) of SA3Ag or placebo and a booster dose or placebo at 6 months. S. aureus isolates from nasal, perineal, and oropharyngeal swabs before and through 12 months post-vaccination were identified. Results: Baseline S. aureus colonization prevalence was 30.6% (any site), with nasal carriage (27.0%) more common than oropharyngeal/perineal (3.2% each). Following initial vaccination (low-dose: 102; mid-dose: 101; high-dose: 101; placebo: 102) and booster (low-dose: 45; mid-dose: 44; high-dose: 27; placebo: 181), placebo and SA3Ag groups showed similar S. aureus carriage through 12 months. Most colonized participants (74.0%) were colonized by single spa types. Placebo and SA3Ag groups had similar persistence of colonization, with 19.6–30.7% due to single spa types. Acquisition was observed in mid- and high-dose recipients (∼20%) and low-dose and placebo recipients (∼12%). Vaccination resulted in substantial increases in antibodies to all 3 antigens, irrespective of carriage status. Conclusions: Based on descriptive analyses of this small study, SA3Ag vaccination did not impact S. aureus acquisition or carriage. Carriage status did not impact antibody responses to SA3Ag.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Infection
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Oct 2019

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