Roles of Morphology, Anatomy, and Aquaporins in Determining Contrasting Hydraulic Behavior of Roots

Helen Bramley, Neil Turner, David Turner, S.D. Tyerman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    125 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The contrasting hydraulic properties of wheat (Triticum aestivum), narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), and yellow lupin(Lupinus luteus) roots were identified by integrating measurements of water flow across different structural levels oforganization with anatomy and modeling. Anatomy played a major role in root hydraulics, influencing axial conductance (Lax)and the distribution of water uptake along the root, with a more localized role for aquaporins (AQPs). Lupin roots had greaterLax than wheat roots, due to greater xylem development. Lax and root hydraulic conductance (Lr) were related to each other,such that both variables increased with distance from the root tip in lupin roots. Lax and Lr were constant with distance from thetip in wheat roots. Despite these contrasting behaviors, the hydraulic conductivity of root cells (Lpc) was similar for all speciesand increased from the root surface toward the endodermis. Lpc was largely controlled by AQPs, as demonstrated by dramaticreductions in Lpc by the AQP blocker mercury. Modeling the root as a series of concentric, cylindrical membranes, and theinhibition of AQP activity at the root level, indicated that water flow in lupin roots occurred primarily through the apoplast,without crossing membranes and without the involvement of AQPs. In contrast, water flow across wheat roots crossedmercury-sensitive AQPs in the endodermis, which significantly influenced Lr. This study demonstrates the importance ofexamining root morphology and anatomy in assessing the role of AQPs in root hydraulics.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)348-364
    JournalPlant Physiology
    Volume150
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

    Fingerprint

    Aquaporins
    aquaporins
    Anatomy
    fluid mechanics
    Lupinus
    Triticum
    Water
    Lupinus angustifolius
    water flow
    root hydraulic conductivity
    Xylem
    endodermis
    wheat
    Membranes
    Meristem
    Mercury
    Lupinus luteus
    apoplast
    root tips
    mercury

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The contrasting hydraulic properties of wheat (Triticum aestivum), narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), and yellow lupin(Lupinus luteus) roots were identified by integrating measurements of water flow across different structural levels oforganization with anatomy and modeling. Anatomy played a major role in root hydraulics, influencing axial conductance (Lax)and the distribution of water uptake along the root, with a more localized role for aquaporins (AQPs). Lupin roots had greaterLax than wheat roots, due to greater xylem development. Lax and root hydraulic conductance (Lr) were related to each other,such that both variables increased with distance from the root tip in lupin roots. Lax and Lr were constant with distance from thetip in wheat roots. Despite these contrasting behaviors, the hydraulic conductivity of root cells (Lpc) was similar for all speciesand increased from the root surface toward the endodermis. Lpc was largely controlled by AQPs, as demonstrated by dramaticreductions in Lpc by the AQP blocker mercury. Modeling the root as a series of concentric, cylindrical membranes, and theinhibition of AQP activity at the root level, indicated that water flow in lupin roots occurred primarily through the apoplast,without crossing membranes and without the involvement of AQPs. In contrast, water flow across wheat roots crossedmercury-sensitive AQPs in the endodermis, which significantly influenced Lr. This study demonstrates the importance ofexamining root morphology and anatomy in assessing the role of AQPs in root hydraulics.",
    author = "Helen Bramley and Neil Turner and David Turner and S.D. Tyerman",
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    Roles of Morphology, Anatomy, and Aquaporins in Determining Contrasting Hydraulic Behavior of Roots. / Bramley, Helen; Turner, Neil; Turner, David; Tyerman, S.D.

    In: Plant Physiology, Vol. 150, No. 1, 2009, p. 348-364.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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