Role of viral and bacterial pathogens in causing pneumonia among Western Australian children

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Through May 2015-October 2017, 230 radiologically-confinned pneumonia cases and age-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Nasopharyngeal specimens were collected and tested for the presence of microorganisms, pathogen density and host immune response (cytokine/chemokine). Cases and controls were compared. Findings showed respiratory viruses contributed 45% of childhood pneumonia hospitalisation in Western Australia with respiratory syncytial virus the leading contributor. Increased densities for some viruses were associated with pneumonia. Combining elevated blood biomarkers and clinical symptoms improved the discrimination between bacterial and viral pneumonia. Cases had increased cytokine/chemokine concentration for IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. IP-10 appeared as potential immune marker for viral pneumonia.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Award date4 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2019

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